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Ruby and the Alarm Bird, and: Washing my father’s hands, and: Translations, and: Turnstile

Ruby and the Alarm Bird, and: Washing my father’s hands, and: Translations, and: Turnstile Christina Hutchins ``Ruby and the Alarm Bird' was inspired by a young woman, Ruby Ward-Gross, who actually appeared with a full-sized dictionary along the bank of a Northern California swimming hole I occasionally frequent. It was nearly October, the water chilly. I took note of her lovely name, and we enjoyed a discussion of feminist theory. It was only after the poem had composed itself and was undergoing revisions that I realized the poem's `Ruby' was not the woman I had met. Rather, Ruby had emerged as the child-self of the poet. Likewise, `Turnstile'--also without intention or conscious awareness-- made itself as a sort of philosophical meditation on the creative process. In his 1928 Process and Reality, Alfred North Whitehead writes, `There is nothing in the real world which is merely an inert fact. Every reality is there for feeling: it promotes feeling; and it is felt. Also, there is nothing which belongs merely to the privacy poetry of feeling of one individual actuality. All origination is private. But what has been thus originated, publicly pervades the world.' These poems, moving by associative leaps of feeling, together represent a turning of style, experienced by me as a form http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

Ruby and the Alarm Bird, and: Washing my father’s hands, and: Translations, and: Turnstile

The Missouri Review , Volume 32 (1) – May 9, 2009

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University of Missouri
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Copyright © University of Missouri
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1548-9930
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Abstract

Christina Hutchins ``Ruby and the Alarm Bird' was inspired by a young woman, Ruby Ward-Gross, who actually appeared with a full-sized dictionary along the bank of a Northern California swimming hole I occasionally frequent. It was nearly October, the water chilly. I took note of her lovely name, and we enjoyed a discussion of feminist theory. It was only after the poem had composed itself and was undergoing revisions that I realized the poem's `Ruby' was not the woman I had met. Rather, Ruby had emerged as the child-self of the poet. Likewise, `Turnstile'--also without intention or conscious awareness-- made itself as a sort of philosophical meditation on the creative process. In his 1928 Process and Reality, Alfred North Whitehead writes, `There is nothing in the real world which is merely an inert fact. Every reality is there for feeling: it promotes feeling; and it is felt. Also, there is nothing which belongs merely to the privacy poetry of feeling of one individual actuality. All origination is private. But what has been thus originated, publicly pervades the world.' These poems, moving by associative leaps of feeling, together represent a turning of style, experienced by me as a form

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: May 9, 2009

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