Rotation

Rotation ROTATION/Jessica Garratt When a day is bright, when we can see everything nicely, because some energy moves behind and inside the air, wholly separate from it--an energy that travels quite quickly but appears still, and unscientific, as lives do, as does one moment inside a mind, full and muted as a lake--when this thing called light looses upon half the earth, it is for a reason: the earth is suspended in a great clearing, having rooted there, and grown over a very large number of moments --each one thick as the meaning that swims, more ancient than turtles, beneath the word now-- when this very earth turns a certain direction, and someone driving to work squints, curses the light, it is because, rising up from behind the highway, between the trees where birds come alive--singing, a bright pattern crossing the stark inner walls of their biology--is a star. The woman drives slowly into a star, half-swallowed by exhaustion, but relieved to at last be rescued by day--at last she is no longer crushed by the pressure to sleep (sleep!) through the unignorable stillness of the house, of everything but the trees and the clock, and herself, wandering through http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

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Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ROTATION/Jessica Garratt When a day is bright, when we can see everything nicely, because some energy moves behind and inside the air, wholly separate from it--an energy that travels quite quickly but appears still, and unscientific, as lives do, as does one moment inside a mind, full and muted as a lake--when this thing called light looses upon half the earth, it is for a reason: the earth is suspended in a great clearing, having rooted there, and grown over a very large number of moments --each one thick as the meaning that swims, more ancient than turtles, beneath the word now-- when this very earth turns a certain direction, and someone driving to work squints, curses the light, it is because, rising up from behind the highway, between the trees where birds come alive--singing, a bright pattern crossing the stark inner walls of their biology--is a star. The woman drives slowly into a star, half-swallowed by exhaustion, but relieved to at last be rescued by day--at last she is no longer crushed by the pressure to sleep (sleep!) through the unignorable stillness of the house, of everything but the trees and the clock, and herself, wandering through

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Oct 8, 2004

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