How to Be Alone (review)

How to Be Alone (review) Waite's job for himself. Grant kills innocent and guüty alike. He even goes so far as to kül the son of the judge who had earlier deputized him in order to stir Grove HiU into Book Award. So much for the death of the social novel. Now Franzen has followed The Corrections with a coUection of essays, How to Be Alone. Most of the thirteen exacting vengeance against the village. Franklin belongs to a rising generation of Southern writers. He does pieces included have been previously published in periodicals such as The New Yorker and Details. Among them is a trimmed and revised version of not write in the baroque style that has unfortunately become associated with Southern letters. His descriptions of the Southwestern Alabama the Harper's essay (now titled "Why Bother?"); a powerful and heartfelt reflection upon his father's struggle against the ravages of Alzheimer's; a tale of bureaucracy and the U.S. Post Office ("Lost in the Mail"); an essay on the prison system ("Control landscape in this novel are rich in detaU, but Franklin's sentences themQS) How to Be Alone selves are as spare as they are true. Units"); and a seU-impUcating broadside against the evils http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

How to Be Alone (review)

The Missouri Review, Volume 26 (1) – Oct 5, 2003

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Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Waite's job for himself. Grant kills innocent and guüty alike. He even goes so far as to kül the son of the judge who had earlier deputized him in order to stir Grove HiU into Book Award. So much for the death of the social novel. Now Franzen has followed The Corrections with a coUection of essays, How to Be Alone. Most of the thirteen exacting vengeance against the village. Franklin belongs to a rising generation of Southern writers. He does pieces included have been previously published in periodicals such as The New Yorker and Details. Among them is a trimmed and revised version of not write in the baroque style that has unfortunately become associated with Southern letters. His descriptions of the Southwestern Alabama the Harper's essay (now titled "Why Bother?"); a powerful and heartfelt reflection upon his father's struggle against the ravages of Alzheimer's; a tale of bureaucracy and the U.S. Post Office ("Lost in the Mail"); an essay on the prison system ("Control landscape in this novel are rich in detaU, but Franklin's sentences themQS) How to Be Alone selves are as spare as they are true. Units"); and a seU-impUcating broadside against the evils

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Oct 5, 2003

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