How History Would Have It, and: Redemption, and: Arcadia, and: Watershed

How History Would Have It, and: Redemption, and: Arcadia, and: Watershed Rose McLarney poetr y "A couple of years ago, thinking about the cautionary-feeling but often rather irrational and amoral Appalachian lore that haunted the area where I grew up, I set out to write contemporary folk tales and ghost stories. But I'm not actually all that interested in the otherworldly or transcendent, and I am keenly concerned with the earthly and idiosyncratic. So the project turned into an examination of the many versions of any story that almost always exist. I looked at how, due to the subjectivity of first-person accounts and the shape-shifting quality of memory, the telling makes the meaning, whether we are taking folk tales across oceans and through centuries or forming our recollections of the events of our own lives. And I began permitting my poetic voices, which had once aspired to be authoritative, to speak like human voices, to ask questions, to pause, to waver if need be. Even more, I wanted to let them be generous and inclusive, allowing for the multiple versions of the story (and the reader's speculation and input). There are signs of the poems' restlessness and their dissatisfaction with the moral that history is supposed to teach in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

How History Would Have It, and: Redemption, and: Arcadia, and: Watershed

The Missouri Review, Volume 36 (3) – Oct 17, 2013

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Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930
Publisher site
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Abstract

Rose McLarney poetr y "A couple of years ago, thinking about the cautionary-feeling but often rather irrational and amoral Appalachian lore that haunted the area where I grew up, I set out to write contemporary folk tales and ghost stories. But I'm not actually all that interested in the otherworldly or transcendent, and I am keenly concerned with the earthly and idiosyncratic. So the project turned into an examination of the many versions of any story that almost always exist. I looked at how, due to the subjectivity of first-person accounts and the shape-shifting quality of memory, the telling makes the meaning, whether we are taking folk tales across oceans and through centuries or forming our recollections of the events of our own lives. And I began permitting my poetic voices, which had once aspired to be authoritative, to speak like human voices, to ask questions, to pause, to waver if need be. Even more, I wanted to let them be generous and inclusive, allowing for the multiple versions of the story (and the reader's speculation and input). There are signs of the poems' restlessness and their dissatisfaction with the moral that history is supposed to teach in

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Oct 17, 2013

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