For Our Beloved Country: The Diary of A Bugler

For Our Beloved Country: The Diary of A Bugler FOR OUR BELOVED COUNTRY: THE DIARY OF A BUGLER / Introduction The Civil War began in a flurry of patriotism and powerful sentiments astonished at the level of emotion expressed in crowds. Young men rushed to sign up for the adventure of war. Among them was an eighteen-yearold from Charlestown, Massachusetts, named . Rejected by a doctor for service in a Massachusetts regiment, apparently because he was too skinny, he went elsewhere and eventually signed up to be a bugler with the First New England Cavalry. Sargent would then serve two years, reenlist as a veteran, and stay through the end of the war. During his training period, he began to take diary notes, continued to indication when--he recopied his diary into a single book, adding further details and anecdotes. Both the beginning and end of the final copy, and various passages throughout, include comments that were certainly added at this later time, yet the bulk of the document was composed in the field. The result was a diary-based reminiscence covering a remarkable before have been this closely detailed--the life of a field musician in the cavalry. do so throughout the war, and sometime afterwards--there is no clear http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

For Our Beloved Country: The Diary of A Bugler

The Missouri Review, Volume 12 (3) – Oct 5, 1989

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Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930
Publisher site
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Abstract

FOR OUR BELOVED COUNTRY: THE DIARY OF A BUGLER / Introduction The Civil War began in a flurry of patriotism and powerful sentiments astonished at the level of emotion expressed in crowds. Young men rushed to sign up for the adventure of war. Among them was an eighteen-yearold from Charlestown, Massachusetts, named . Rejected by a doctor for service in a Massachusetts regiment, apparently because he was too skinny, he went elsewhere and eventually signed up to be a bugler with the First New England Cavalry. Sargent would then serve two years, reenlist as a veteran, and stay through the end of the war. During his training period, he began to take diary notes, continued to indication when--he recopied his diary into a single book, adding further details and anecdotes. Both the beginning and end of the final copy, and various passages throughout, include comments that were certainly added at this later time, yet the bulk of the document was composed in the field. The result was a diary-based reminiscence covering a remarkable before have been this closely detailed--the life of a field musician in the cavalry. do so throughout the war, and sometime afterwards--there is no clear

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Oct 5, 1989

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