Elegy For My Grandmother

Elegy For My Grandmother Nicholas Christopher Now you're in the place where the shadows fly, light-years away from this palm forest-- the room I've taken overlooking the Caribbean, parrots squawking at the stars and coconuts thudding to earth. At your old house the garden lies barren; lightning split the cherry trees, black vines choked the azaleas. You were famous for your green thumb. Neighbors brought you their ailing plants, and after a week on your terrace the puniest amaryllis turned prodigy. Your bags were always packed: you loved to travel first-class, to sail south at the earliest sign of winter. I have a photograph of you in prewar Havana wearing a white coat and feathered hat after a day at the races, I remember you were cursed with eyesight so sharp it daggered migraines through your temples. Once, driving in the country, you glanced at a distant forest-- a blue band across the hills-- gazing to sea (these same flashing waters) from the casino balcony. and counted the crows on a single bough. You were first onto the dancefloor when the music started--and last to sit. Before I could read, you taught me poems and riddles, and those intricate parables with the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

Elegy For My Grandmother

The Missouri Review, Volume 10 (3) – Oct 5, 1987

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-missouri/elegy-for-my-grandmother-JzGeCd0xcn
Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nicholas Christopher Now you're in the place where the shadows fly, light-years away from this palm forest-- the room I've taken overlooking the Caribbean, parrots squawking at the stars and coconuts thudding to earth. At your old house the garden lies barren; lightning split the cherry trees, black vines choked the azaleas. You were famous for your green thumb. Neighbors brought you their ailing plants, and after a week on your terrace the puniest amaryllis turned prodigy. Your bags were always packed: you loved to travel first-class, to sail south at the earliest sign of winter. I have a photograph of you in prewar Havana wearing a white coat and feathered hat after a day at the races, I remember you were cursed with eyesight so sharp it daggered migraines through your temples. Once, driving in the country, you glanced at a distant forest-- a blue band across the hills-- gazing to sea (these same flashing waters) from the casino balcony. and counted the crows on a single bough. You were first onto the dancefloor when the music started--and last to sit. Before I could read, you taught me poems and riddles, and those intricate parables with the

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Oct 5, 1987

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off