Cartographies, and: Borges, and: Shackleton, and: Columbus, and: Stevenson, and: Song, and: Geometry and Angling

Cartographies, and: Borges, and: Shackleton, and: Columbus, and: Stevenson, and: Song, and:... Christopher Robinson poetr y "Many of my role models considered themselves failures. Some of them were mad, some of them blind; all of them were artificers like Borges or searchers like Shackleton. As an artificer myself, I have come to believe that makers are a subset of searchers, that creative invention is an attempt to locate and define the self. And like many worthwhile endeavors, this one is bound to fail, for the self is inherently unlocatable. This is partially because the self is a fiction--a useful simplification of a consciousness that is distributed in space and time. "In the `Cartographies' poems, I have taken on personae, not to escape the self but to more accurately locate it. Stevenson reaches forward in time, calling out to Borges; Shackleton contemplates Homer. These are attempts to see my own blind spots, without the lens of my own particular madness. An impossible task, but one no less valuable for being impossible. "The poem `Geometry and Angling' takes the isolated self and spins it out into a world full of other selves. I am reminded of Zeno's paradox, where we learn that movement is impossible (before covering any distance, one must first http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

Cartographies, and: Borges, and: Shackleton, and: Columbus, and: Stevenson, and: Song, and: Geometry and Angling

The Missouri Review, Volume 35 (3) – Feb 14, 2012

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Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930
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Abstract

Christopher Robinson poetr y "Many of my role models considered themselves failures. Some of them were mad, some of them blind; all of them were artificers like Borges or searchers like Shackleton. As an artificer myself, I have come to believe that makers are a subset of searchers, that creative invention is an attempt to locate and define the self. And like many worthwhile endeavors, this one is bound to fail, for the self is inherently unlocatable. This is partially because the self is a fiction--a useful simplification of a consciousness that is distributed in space and time. "In the `Cartographies' poems, I have taken on personae, not to escape the self but to more accurately locate it. Stevenson reaches forward in time, calling out to Borges; Shackleton contemplates Homer. These are attempts to see my own blind spots, without the lens of my own particular madness. An impossible task, but one no less valuable for being impossible. "The poem `Geometry and Angling' takes the isolated self and spins it out into a world full of other selves. I am reminded of Zeno's paradox, where we learn that movement is impossible (before covering any distance, one must first

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Feb 14, 2012

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