Aubade, and: Home, and: Seeing Pittsburgh, and: Fathers And Sons

Aubade, and: Home, and: Seeing Pittsburgh, and: Fathers And Sons AUBADE / This morning, the 18th of June, I wake in the light of heaven Annibale Carracci hung on the ceiling Of the Farnese Gallery. From the leaves of the beech, The day flares like copper The wind-chimes bright as apples In the clear, burnished Italian air. Perhaps it is only an old grammar I am beginning, again, to hear, The chance flurries of Vivaldi, Their complexity of simple delight, But somehow it does not seem strange To find the 17th century Flourishing here in Pennsylvania, Early mornings late in the spring. All night I have been dreaming Of the sadness of gloves, of skins In which the body is missing, Like trying to remember home. Now I see once more How the body comes back like the world Waking through all five senses And the ones beyond. Every day my father woke to a glare Like water breaking across his eyes, Bathed in the cold dawn of Pittsburgh, And walked away uphill. No music, No squares of sunshine unhinging themselves Like whole piazzas of heaven From the ceilings of Rome. Only the trolley Swaying beneath its grid of sky, 26 · The Missouri Review The pigeons in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

Aubade, and: Home, and: Seeing Pittsburgh, and: Fathers And Sons

The Missouri Review, Volume 5 (2) – Oct 5, 1981

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Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930
Publisher site
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Abstract

AUBADE / This morning, the 18th of June, I wake in the light of heaven Annibale Carracci hung on the ceiling Of the Farnese Gallery. From the leaves of the beech, The day flares like copper The wind-chimes bright as apples In the clear, burnished Italian air. Perhaps it is only an old grammar I am beginning, again, to hear, The chance flurries of Vivaldi, Their complexity of simple delight, But somehow it does not seem strange To find the 17th century Flourishing here in Pennsylvania, Early mornings late in the spring. All night I have been dreaming Of the sadness of gloves, of skins In which the body is missing, Like trying to remember home. Now I see once more How the body comes back like the world Waking through all five senses And the ones beyond. Every day my father woke to a glare Like water breaking across his eyes, Bathed in the cold dawn of Pittsburgh, And walked away uphill. No music, No squares of sunshine unhinging themselves Like whole piazzas of heaven From the ceilings of Rome. Only the trolley Swaying beneath its grid of sky, 26 · The Missouri Review The pigeons in

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Oct 5, 1981

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