Anyuta

Anyuta ANYUTA / FeJJi Translated from the Russian by Nina Kennedy Teffi was the pseudonym, taken from a Kipling character, of Nadezhda Alexsandrovna Buchinskaya (1876-1952), author of over twenty books of stories, plays, and poems. Several were published in old Russia, more in Paris, a few in other European cities. Because of a divorce in Russia separating her from two daughters (after which she began writing) and a long love affair in France, Teffi always was reticent about her personal life. "I was born," she once said, "in Petersburg in the spring, and as one knows, our Petersburg spring is extremely changeable; either the sun shines or it rains. That is why I have two faces, like Greek masks, a laughing and a weeping one." She laughed in many humorous or gently satiric stories and cried in others about neglected children, mistreated animals, and lonely persons. From 1906 to the Revolution she experienced her great popularity in Russia, so much so that a candy with her name on the wrapper and a perfume were named for her. Her feuilletons appeared in a number of periodicals, especially in the widely read New Word. The tsar read these aloud to his http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-missouri/anyuta-adWsDRjIM0
Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ANYUTA / FeJJi Translated from the Russian by Nina Kennedy Teffi was the pseudonym, taken from a Kipling character, of Nadezhda Alexsandrovna Buchinskaya (1876-1952), author of over twenty books of stories, plays, and poems. Several were published in old Russia, more in Paris, a few in other European cities. Because of a divorce in Russia separating her from two daughters (after which she began writing) and a long love affair in France, Teffi always was reticent about her personal life. "I was born," she once said, "in Petersburg in the spring, and as one knows, our Petersburg spring is extremely changeable; either the sun shines or it rains. That is why I have two faces, like Greek masks, a laughing and a weeping one." She laughed in many humorous or gently satiric stories and cried in others about neglected children, mistreated animals, and lonely persons. From 1906 to the Revolution she experienced her great popularity in Russia, so much so that a candy with her name on the wrapper and a perfume were named for her. Her feuilletons appeared in a number of periodicals, especially in the widely read New Word. The tsar read these aloud to his

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Oct 5, 1987

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off