An Interview with William Gass

An Interview with William Gass An Interview with / Lorna H. Domke Interviewer: I've read that you decided to become a writer at an early age. Gass: My parents say that I made the announcement to be a writer about age eight. They say I made that announcement after giving up being a fireman, and it sounded to them about the same. I never changed my mind. I have no idea why. There's nothing in my background--my parents were teachers. My mother taught briefly before she got married, and then she was a mother the way people used to be. My father was an architect, but he had injuries during World War I which made it impossible for him to work over a drafting board, so he taught mechanical drawing in high school. Interviewer: Did you write in college? Gass: When I was at Kenyon, there were some very splendid people in English, John Crowe Ransom in particular, whom I admired very much. I sat in on some of his classes, but I never took them--I did take some later in graduate school. But I was such a smart ass; I didn't think they could teach me anything then about literature, and I http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

An Interview with William Gass

The Missouri Review, Volume 10 (3) – Oct 5, 1987

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Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

An Interview with / Lorna H. Domke Interviewer: I've read that you decided to become a writer at an early age. Gass: My parents say that I made the announcement to be a writer about age eight. They say I made that announcement after giving up being a fireman, and it sounded to them about the same. I never changed my mind. I have no idea why. There's nothing in my background--my parents were teachers. My mother taught briefly before she got married, and then she was a mother the way people used to be. My father was an architect, but he had injuries during World War I which made it impossible for him to work over a drafting board, so he taught mechanical drawing in high school. Interviewer: Did you write in college? Gass: When I was at Kenyon, there were some very splendid people in English, John Crowe Ransom in particular, whom I admired very much. I sat in on some of his classes, but I never took them--I did take some later in graduate school. But I was such a smart ass; I didn't think they could teach me anything then about literature, and I

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Oct 5, 1987

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