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"You CAN Play Mathematical Equations on the Violin!": Quantifying Artistic Learning Outcomes for Assessment Purposes

"You CAN Play Mathematical Equations on the Violin!": Quantifying Artistic Learning Outcomes for... frank p. tomasulo the french philosopher of science Jules Henri Poincaré (1854­1912) once said, "You cannot play mathematical equations on the violin." By that he meant simply that there was a decided difference between the sciences and the arts. Yet in today's academy, internal effectiveness reviews and external accreditation agencies require us to do just that--"to play mathematical equations on the violin," so to speak--by insisting that film department administrators and faculty come up with measurable outcomes and results, as well as the means by which to evaluate artistic qualities such as talent; beauty; and "good" screenwriting, cinematography, directing, acting, editing, sound, and set design, and so on. This article demonstrates how the Florida State University Film School complied with this seemingly impossible task and how the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) and Master of Fine Arts (MFA) programs have actually benefited from embracing mandated statistical assessment opportunities. To begin, I should note that I was not originally a proponent of such assessment strategies. The vast majority of professors in the arts frank p. tomasulo is a professor and the head of film studies at the College of Motion Picture, Television and Recording Arts at Florida State University. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

"You CAN Play Mathematical Equations on the Violin!": Quantifying Artistic Learning Outcomes for Assessment Purposes

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 60 (3-4) – Oct 3, 2008

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
ISSN
1934-6018
Publisher site
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Abstract

frank p. tomasulo the french philosopher of science Jules Henri Poincaré (1854­1912) once said, "You cannot play mathematical equations on the violin." By that he meant simply that there was a decided difference between the sciences and the arts. Yet in today's academy, internal effectiveness reviews and external accreditation agencies require us to do just that--"to play mathematical equations on the violin," so to speak--by insisting that film department administrators and faculty come up with measurable outcomes and results, as well as the means by which to evaluate artistic qualities such as talent; beauty; and "good" screenwriting, cinematography, directing, acting, editing, sound, and set design, and so on. This article demonstrates how the Florida State University Film School complied with this seemingly impossible task and how the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) and Master of Fine Arts (MFA) programs have actually benefited from embracing mandated statistical assessment opportunities. To begin, I should note that I was not originally a proponent of such assessment strategies. The vast majority of professors in the arts frank p. tomasulo is a professor and the head of film studies at the College of Motion Picture, Television and Recording Arts at Florida State University.

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Oct 3, 2008

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