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What Video-Journalists Can Learn from Alfred Hitchcock's Cardinal Rule of Filmmaking

What Video-Journalists Can Learn from Alfred Hitchcock's Cardinal Rule of Filmmaking What Video-Journalists Can Learn from Alfred Hitchcock’s Cardinal Rule of Filmmaking kurt lancaster fr ançois truffaut, the famed French perceptible without resorting to dialogue” (17). New Wave director of The 400 Blows (1959) and Hitchcock made dialogue scenes cinematic by Jules and Jim (1962), among other films, was filming subtext—what characters think and feel astounded at serious film critics’ mainly nega- made visible through the eyes, gestures, and the tive reception of Alfred Hitchcock’s films. He was full body language of his performers. flummoxed by what he saw as Hitchcock being Although Truffaut makes his case for Hitch- “victimized in American intellectual circles be- cock as a narrative film artist—and his book cause of his facetious response to interviewers”; documenting this conversation with Hitchcock Truffaut felt “it was obvious that [Hitchcock] had did help change the minds of American intel- —I want to given more thought to the potential of his art than lectuals regarding Hitchcock’s legacy any of his colleagues” (11–12). Truffaut realized extend that conversation into the realm of video- by making the case that when nar- that the cardinal rule of cinema was at the heart journalism of Hitchcock’s art: “Whatever is said instead of ration http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

What Video-Journalists Can Learn from Alfred Hitchcock's Cardinal Rule of Filmmaking

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 71 (2) – Jun 10, 2019

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1934-6018

Abstract

What Video-Journalists Can Learn from Alfred Hitchcock’s Cardinal Rule of Filmmaking kurt lancaster fr ançois truffaut, the famed French perceptible without resorting to dialogue” (17). New Wave director of The 400 Blows (1959) and Hitchcock made dialogue scenes cinematic by Jules and Jim (1962), among other films, was filming subtext—what characters think and feel astounded at serious film critics’ mainly nega- made visible through the eyes, gestures, and the tive reception of Alfred Hitchcock’s films. He was full body language of his performers. flummoxed by what he saw as Hitchcock being Although Truffaut makes his case for Hitch- “victimized in American intellectual circles be- cock as a narrative film artist—and his book cause of his facetious response to interviewers”; documenting this conversation with Hitchcock Truffaut felt “it was obvious that [Hitchcock] had did help change the minds of American intel- —I want to given more thought to the potential of his art than lectuals regarding Hitchcock’s legacy any of his colleagues” (11–12). Truffaut realized extend that conversation into the realm of video- by making the case that when nar- that the cardinal rule of cinema was at the heart journalism of Hitchcock’s art: “Whatever is said instead of ration

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Jun 10, 2019

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