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What Nature Does Not Teach: Didactic Literature in the Medieval and Early-Modern Periods (review)

What Nature Does Not Teach: Didactic Literature in the Medieval and Early-Modern Periods (review) Journal of English and Germanic Philology, April 2011 evolving, central claim about Edmund. The limitation of so many studies about saints is this very pastiche that is the cult itself. A hybrid cultural entity involving art, history, literary texts, liturgy, ritual, politics, and sovereignty, the saint's cult is a gold mine for medieval studies. However, such diversity often fractures exploration of the cult. In my view, some of these articles shy away from the potential role of Edmund's cult as a national standard of sanctity. Then again, such cultural complications and diverse categories of meaning are the very things that intrigue us about saints, and in that regard, this collection adds much to ongoing efforts in hagiographical study. Lesley Allen Greenville College What Nature Does Not Teach: Didactic Literature in the Medieval and Early-Modern Periods. Edited by Juanita Feros Ruys. Disputatio, 15. Turnhout: Brepols Publishers, 2008. Pp. xii + 527; 3 illustrations. $107.60. Given the breadth of the category "didactic literature" and the wide-ranging disciplinary, geographical, and chronological scope of this volume, it would have been all too easy for this anthology to fly apart at the seams. The book is bound together, however, by its contributors' consistent http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JEGP, Journal of English and Germanic Philology University of Illinois Press

What Nature Does Not Teach: Didactic Literature in the Medieval and Early-Modern Periods (review)

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-662X
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Abstract

Journal of English and Germanic Philology, April 2011 evolving, central claim about Edmund. The limitation of so many studies about saints is this very pastiche that is the cult itself. A hybrid cultural entity involving art, history, literary texts, liturgy, ritual, politics, and sovereignty, the saint's cult is a gold mine for medieval studies. However, such diversity often fractures exploration of the cult. In my view, some of these articles shy away from the potential role of Edmund's cult as a national standard of sanctity. Then again, such cultural complications and diverse categories of meaning are the very things that intrigue us about saints, and in that regard, this collection adds much to ongoing efforts in hagiographical study. Lesley Allen Greenville College What Nature Does Not Teach: Didactic Literature in the Medieval and Early-Modern Periods. Edited by Juanita Feros Ruys. Disputatio, 15. Turnhout: Brepols Publishers, 2008. Pp. xii + 527; 3 illustrations. $107.60. Given the breadth of the category "didactic literature" and the wide-ranging disciplinary, geographical, and chronological scope of this volume, it would have been all too easy for this anthology to fly apart at the seams. The book is bound together, however, by its contributors' consistent

Journal

JEGP, Journal of English and Germanic PhilologyUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Mar 30, 2011

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