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What Did Bhimrao Ambedkar Learn from John Dewey's Democracy and Education ?

What Did Bhimrao Ambedkar Learn from John Dewey's Democracy and Education ? What Did Bhimrao Ambedkar Learn from John Dewey’s Democracy and Education? scott r. stroud University of Texas at Austin Bhimrao Ambedkar (1891–1956) is well-known as the architect of the Indian constitution, the document that created the world’s largest democracy when it came into effect in 1950. Ambedkar is also famous, or infamous according to some religious partisans, in the Indian political context for his unflagging and often bombastic advocacy on behalf of India’s so-called “untouchables.” Being a Mahar, an untouchable caste in the Indian state of Maharashtra, Ambedkar knew of the struggles and the religiously underwritten violence that was foisted upon these swaths of Indian society. His struggles in and against the caste system, and the Hindu religious-philosophical system that frequently enabled it, are well documented by scholars of South Asian politics and religion. Accounts such as those of Christophe Jaffrelot and Eleanor Zelliot do an admirable job of sorting out Ambedkar’s political development from a committed reformer within the Hindu system, allied with Gandhi’s methods and aims in the 1920s, to a renunciant of Hinduism and vocal opponent of Gandhi’s intra-Hindu reform efforts starting in the 1930s.1 As they aptly note, Ambedkar pulls away from Hinduism in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

What Did Bhimrao Ambedkar Learn from John Dewey's Democracy and Education ?

The Pluralist , Volume 12 – Jul 20, 2017

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University of Illinois Press
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Copyright © University of Illinois Press
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Abstract

What Did Bhimrao Ambedkar Learn from John Dewey’s Democracy and Education? scott r. stroud University of Texas at Austin Bhimrao Ambedkar (1891–1956) is well-known as the architect of the Indian constitution, the document that created the world’s largest democracy when it came into effect in 1950. Ambedkar is also famous, or infamous according to some religious partisans, in the Indian political context for his unflagging and often bombastic advocacy on behalf of India’s so-called “untouchables.” Being a Mahar, an untouchable caste in the Indian state of Maharashtra, Ambedkar knew of the struggles and the religiously underwritten violence that was foisted upon these swaths of Indian society. His struggles in and against the caste system, and the Hindu religious-philosophical system that frequently enabled it, are well documented by scholars of South Asian politics and religion. Accounts such as those of Christophe Jaffrelot and Eleanor Zelliot do an admirable job of sorting out Ambedkar’s political development from a committed reformer within the Hindu system, allied with Gandhi’s methods and aims in the 1920s, to a renunciant of Hinduism and vocal opponent of Gandhi’s intra-Hindu reform efforts starting in the 1930s.1 As they aptly note, Ambedkar pulls away from Hinduism in

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Jul 20, 2017

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