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Von Trier's Cinematic Games

Von Trier's Cinematic Games jan simons The Dogme95: Filmmaking as Game in jørgen leth's de fem benspænd [the five obstructions] (2003), director Lars von Trier demonstrates his well-known predilection for games. The film chronicles Leth's shooting of his unconventional remake of his 1967 documentary, Det perfekte menneske [The Perfect Man], during which Von Trier subjects the director to the same shooting procedures he has always followed.1 For each of his own films, Von Trier has produced a manifesto or set of "production notes"--principles and rules he and his crew must following during the production. For Von Trier, "The Rules," more commonly known as the "Vow of Chastity," which are part of the Dogme95 Manifesto, are nothing exceptional, just "business as usual."2 These rules have generally been interpreted as a call to realism, since they forbid the use of any prop, light, or sound that the filmmaker does not find at the location. This seems to obligate him (the Dogme95 directors formed an all-male brotherhood) to record a pristine, unadorned, unmanipulated reality. Moreover, since the director is not allowed to adjust the set in any way, these rules seem to force the Dogme95 filmmaker to focus on contemporary issues and themes. However, the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

Von Trier's Cinematic Games

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 60 (1) – Mar 31, 2008

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1934-6018
Publisher site
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Abstract

jan simons The Dogme95: Filmmaking as Game in jørgen leth's de fem benspænd [the five obstructions] (2003), director Lars von Trier demonstrates his well-known predilection for games. The film chronicles Leth's shooting of his unconventional remake of his 1967 documentary, Det perfekte menneske [The Perfect Man], during which Von Trier subjects the director to the same shooting procedures he has always followed.1 For each of his own films, Von Trier has produced a manifesto or set of "production notes"--principles and rules he and his crew must following during the production. For Von Trier, "The Rules," more commonly known as the "Vow of Chastity," which are part of the Dogme95 Manifesto, are nothing exceptional, just "business as usual."2 These rules have generally been interpreted as a call to realism, since they forbid the use of any prop, light, or sound that the filmmaker does not find at the location. This seems to obligate him (the Dogme95 directors formed an all-male brotherhood) to record a pristine, unadorned, unmanipulated reality. Moreover, since the director is not allowed to adjust the set in any way, these rules seem to force the Dogme95 filmmaker to focus on contemporary issues and themes. However, the

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Mar 31, 2008

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