Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Transcendentalism, Pragmatism, and Skepticism: A Response to Saito

Transcendentalism, Pragmatism, and Skepticism: A Response to Saito Transcendentalism, Pragmatism, and Skepticism: A Response to Saito jim garrison Virginia Tech walt w hitm an wr ites : “The Americans of all nations at any time upon the earth have probably the fullest poetical nature” (5). Naoko Saito is an American philosopher and something of a Whitmanesque philosophical poet. Saito’s book is “the product of many years spent reading and studying American philosophy” (Saito xi). She further indicates: “Mostly I have done this from a remote part of the world—far from America across the Pacific Ocean—and, like so many others, in a language that is not my own” (xi). Saito is a scholar in and of translation. Saito states that the “tensioned relationship between Dewey and Emerson, and more broadly pragmatism and American transcendentalism . . . is car- ried forward into the present text, and with a new focus on translation“ (xi– xii). Her text resolves the tension in favor of transcendentalism approached through her teacher, the late Stanley Cavell (Saito xi–xii). In responding to Saito, I tend to resolve the tension in the other direction, aligning more with another of her teachers, the late Hilary Putnam, as well as her mentor Richard Bernstein. Cavell sharply contrasts http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

Transcendentalism, Pragmatism, and Skepticism: A Response to Saito

The Pluralist , Volume 17 – Feb 26, 2022

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-illinois-press/transcendentalism-pragmatism-and-skepticism-a-response-to-saito-IFphLaex0d
Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
ISSN
1944-6489

Abstract

Transcendentalism, Pragmatism, and Skepticism: A Response to Saito jim garrison Virginia Tech walt w hitm an wr ites : “The Americans of all nations at any time upon the earth have probably the fullest poetical nature” (5). Naoko Saito is an American philosopher and something of a Whitmanesque philosophical poet. Saito’s book is “the product of many years spent reading and studying American philosophy” (Saito xi). She further indicates: “Mostly I have done this from a remote part of the world—far from America across the Pacific Ocean—and, like so many others, in a language that is not my own” (xi). Saito is a scholar in and of translation. Saito states that the “tensioned relationship between Dewey and Emerson, and more broadly pragmatism and American transcendentalism . . . is car- ried forward into the present text, and with a new focus on translation“ (xi– xii). Her text resolves the tension in favor of transcendentalism approached through her teacher, the late Stanley Cavell (Saito xi–xii). In responding to Saito, I tend to resolve the tension in the other direction, aligning more with another of her teachers, the late Hilary Putnam, as well as her mentor Richard Bernstein. Cavell sharply contrasts

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Feb 26, 2022

There are no references for this article.