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Tiny Life: Technology and Masculinity in the Films of David Fincher

Tiny Life: Technology and Masculinity in the Films of David Fincher michele schreiber I don't know how much movies should entertain. To me, I am always interested in movies that scar. --David Fincher (Salisbury 83) in the preceding quote david fincher suggests that the best films penetrate and sometimes arrest our senses to the degree that they leave a mark on our psyche that persists long after the film has ended. As we know, films themselves can also be scarred. Whether the scars are made deliberately or through the wear and tear caused by transport, repeated viewing, or faulty machinery, a film print sustains marks that suggest the extent of the geography it has traversed. In both of these cases, we (and Fincher) assume that the scar is evidence of the pricking of a fixed entity--whether human or filmic. But how do we come to understand this process differently when the very nature of knowing and feeling bodies is changing? With the turn from analog to digital film, and as our own bodies are becoming increasingly inter twined with technology, we must ask now more than ever, how do we "feel" and "know" when scars have been inflicted? Fincher's comments are resonant when we think about how changing conceptions http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

Tiny Life: Technology and Masculinity in the Films of David Fincher

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 68 (1) – Mar 9, 2016

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1934-6018
Publisher site
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Abstract

michele schreiber I don't know how much movies should entertain. To me, I am always interested in movies that scar. --David Fincher (Salisbury 83) in the preceding quote david fincher suggests that the best films penetrate and sometimes arrest our senses to the degree that they leave a mark on our psyche that persists long after the film has ended. As we know, films themselves can also be scarred. Whether the scars are made deliberately or through the wear and tear caused by transport, repeated viewing, or faulty machinery, a film print sustains marks that suggest the extent of the geography it has traversed. In both of these cases, we (and Fincher) assume that the scar is evidence of the pricking of a fixed entity--whether human or filmic. But how do we come to understand this process differently when the very nature of knowing and feeling bodies is changing? With the turn from analog to digital film, and as our own bodies are becoming increasingly inter twined with technology, we must ask now more than ever, how do we "feel" and "know" when scars have been inflicted? Fincher's comments are resonant when we think about how changing conceptions

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Mar 9, 2016

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