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Tiny Life: Technology and Masculinity in the Films of David Fincher

Tiny Life: Technology and Masculinity in the Films of David Fincher Tiny Life: Technology and Masculinity in the Films of David Fincher michele schreiber I don’t know how much movies should entertain. To me, I am always interested in movies that scar. —David Fincher (Salisbury 83) in the preceding quote david fincher ety arises when the forward momentum of in­ sugge s ts that the best films penetrate and novation is mixed with nostalgia for the certainty sometimes arrest our senses to the degree that of the past. This complex dynamic is central they leave a mark on our psyche that persists to conversations about the digital era and the long after the film has ended. As we know, films degree to which its innovations are intertwined themselves can also be scarred. Whether the with bodies: the bodies that labor to create this scars are made deliberately or through the wear technology, those bodies being replaced by this and tear caused by transport, repeated viewing, technology, and the new (non)body of the tech­ or faulty machinery, a film print sustains marks nology that is being invented. that suggest the extent of the geography it These concerns about the links between has traversed. In both of these cases, we (and technology http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

Tiny Life: Technology and Masculinity in the Films of David Fincher

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 68 (1) – Mar 9, 2016

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1934-6018

Abstract

Tiny Life: Technology and Masculinity in the Films of David Fincher michele schreiber I don’t know how much movies should entertain. To me, I am always interested in movies that scar. —David Fincher (Salisbury 83) in the preceding quote david fincher ety arises when the forward momentum of in­ sugge s ts that the best films penetrate and novation is mixed with nostalgia for the certainty sometimes arrest our senses to the degree that of the past. This complex dynamic is central they leave a mark on our psyche that persists to conversations about the digital era and the long after the film has ended. As we know, films degree to which its innovations are intertwined themselves can also be scarred. Whether the with bodies: the bodies that labor to create this scars are made deliberately or through the wear technology, those bodies being replaced by this and tear caused by transport, repeated viewing, technology, and the new (non)body of the tech­ or faulty machinery, a film print sustains marks nology that is being invented. that suggest the extent of the geography it These concerns about the links between has traversed. In both of these cases, we (and technology

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Mar 9, 2016

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