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Thirteen Women (1932): An Unacknowledged Horror Classic

Thirteen Women (1932): An Unacknowledged Horror Classic dawn keetley and gwen hofmann although david archainbaud's Thirteen Women (1932) has earned brief mention in several compendia of horror films, it has never received extended analysis. In an insightful re view of the DVD, which was released as part of the Warner Archive Collection in 2012, John Bei fuss notes that Thirteen Women is "not exactly a horror film," yet he goes on to map its numer ous "horror themes," drawing a line from Ar chainbaud's film to both Friday the 13th (Sean S. Cunningham, 1980) and the Final Destination franchise (2000­11).1 We argue that despite Beifuss's hedging, Thirteen Women is in fact a horror film. Released just one year after Tod Browning's Dracula (1931) and James Whale's Frankenstein (1931), it incorporates important themes of 1930s horror, even as it introduces a quite human "monster" and anticipates the insecure "paranoid" horror that by all accounts did not emerge until the late 1960s.2 While this dawn keetley is an associate professor of Eng lish, teaching horror and gothic literature, film, and television, at Lehigh University. She has recently published on The Walking Dead in The Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts (2014) and The Journal of Popular http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

Thirteen Women (1932): An Unacknowledged Horror Classic

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 68 (1) – Mar 9, 2016

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1934-6018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

dawn keetley and gwen hofmann although david archainbaud's Thirteen Women (1932) has earned brief mention in several compendia of horror films, it has never received extended analysis. In an insightful re view of the DVD, which was released as part of the Warner Archive Collection in 2012, John Bei fuss notes that Thirteen Women is "not exactly a horror film," yet he goes on to map its numer ous "horror themes," drawing a line from Ar chainbaud's film to both Friday the 13th (Sean S. Cunningham, 1980) and the Final Destination franchise (2000­11).1 We argue that despite Beifuss's hedging, Thirteen Women is in fact a horror film. Released just one year after Tod Browning's Dracula (1931) and James Whale's Frankenstein (1931), it incorporates important themes of 1930s horror, even as it introduces a quite human "monster" and anticipates the insecure "paranoid" horror that by all accounts did not emerge until the late 1960s.2 While this dawn keetley is an associate professor of Eng lish, teaching horror and gothic literature, film, and television, at Lehigh University. She has recently published on The Walking Dead in The Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts (2014) and The Journal of Popular

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Mar 9, 2016

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