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Thinking with Whitehead and the American Pragmatists: Experience and Reality eds. by Brian G. Henning, William T. Myers, and Joseph D. John (review)

Thinking with Whitehead and the American Pragmatists: Experience and Reality eds. by Brian G.... Volume 38, Nos. 2–3, May–September 2017 Without clearly resolving these issues, these chapters on moral and religious value, which should be the pinnacle of the book, are perhaps the least satisfying. This is when it is most important to remind the reader that this is not a stand-alone project. Indeed, to be fair, Crosby has written extensively on these issues in other works, and he directs the reader to the other works to fill in the gaps that he openly acknowledges exist in this book. As I have returned to the point that Nature as Sacred Ground must be seen in the context of Crosby’s other works on religious naturalism, it is appropriate to say something about this larger compendium. In these works Crosby, perhaps more than any other philosopher of our time, thoroughly maps out the philosophical terrain of religious naturalism as he argues for his own views. He writes patiently and systematically, presents alternative positions fairly, lays out his own position clearly, and anticipates and responds to objections. While this is an important scholarly contribution, those who teach will appreciate it as a pedagogical contribution as well. The material is accessible to a wide audience, including http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Theology & Philosophy University of Illinois Press

Thinking with Whitehead and the American Pragmatists: Experience and Reality eds. by Brian G. Henning, William T. Myers, and Joseph D. John (review)

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
2156-4795
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Abstract

Volume 38, Nos. 2–3, May–September 2017 Without clearly resolving these issues, these chapters on moral and religious value, which should be the pinnacle of the book, are perhaps the least satisfying. This is when it is most important to remind the reader that this is not a stand-alone project. Indeed, to be fair, Crosby has written extensively on these issues in other works, and he directs the reader to the other works to fill in the gaps that he openly acknowledges exist in this book. As I have returned to the point that Nature as Sacred Ground must be seen in the context of Crosby’s other works on religious naturalism, it is appropriate to say something about this larger compendium. In these works Crosby, perhaps more than any other philosopher of our time, thoroughly maps out the philosophical terrain of religious naturalism as he argues for his own views. He writes patiently and systematically, presents alternative positions fairly, lays out his own position clearly, and anticipates and responds to objections. While this is an important scholarly contribution, those who teach will appreciate it as a pedagogical contribution as well. The material is accessible to a wide audience, including

Journal

American Journal of Theology & PhilosophyUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Oct 30, 2017

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