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The Pragmatist Yogi: Ancient and Contemporary Yogic Somaesthetics

The Pragmatist Yogi: Ancient and Contemporary Yogic Somaesthetics eric c. mullis Queens University of Charlotte Depend upon it that, rude and careless as I am, I would fain practice the yoga faithfully. . . . To some extent, and at rare intervals, even I am a yogi. --Henry David Thoreau I knew Vivekananda, when he was here, have read both his books on Hatha Yoga, and did then try (some 6 or 7 years ago) to practice some of the breathing exercises. But I am a bad subject for such things, critical and indocile, so it soon stopped. --William James as de michelis has argued, americans have been fascinated by the psychosomatic discipline of yoga since the turn of the twentieth century.1 The transcendentalists Thoreau and Emerson were influenced by Vedantic philosophy, and William James was intrigued by neo-Vedantic yogic practices as promulgated by Swami Vivekananda.2 Since then, yoga has become a global phenomenon with approximately 20.4 million Americans regularly practicing the discipline.3 In this essay, I will consider the implications of yoga practice for pragmatist philosophy and, more specifically, for the discipline of somaesthetics as developed by Richard Shusterman. In an early work, Shusterman notes that "practical somaesthetics" entails practicing psychosomatic disciplines that can improve http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

The Pragmatist Yogi: Ancient and Contemporary Yogic Somaesthetics

The Pluralist , Volume 10 (2) – Jun 19, 2015

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University of Illinois Press
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Copyright © University of Illinois Press
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1944-6489
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Abstract

eric c. mullis Queens University of Charlotte Depend upon it that, rude and careless as I am, I would fain practice the yoga faithfully. . . . To some extent, and at rare intervals, even I am a yogi. --Henry David Thoreau I knew Vivekananda, when he was here, have read both his books on Hatha Yoga, and did then try (some 6 or 7 years ago) to practice some of the breathing exercises. But I am a bad subject for such things, critical and indocile, so it soon stopped. --William James as de michelis has argued, americans have been fascinated by the psychosomatic discipline of yoga since the turn of the twentieth century.1 The transcendentalists Thoreau and Emerson were influenced by Vedantic philosophy, and William James was intrigued by neo-Vedantic yogic practices as promulgated by Swami Vivekananda.2 Since then, yoga has become a global phenomenon with approximately 20.4 million Americans regularly practicing the discipline.3 In this essay, I will consider the implications of yoga practice for pragmatist philosophy and, more specifically, for the discipline of somaesthetics as developed by Richard Shusterman. In an early work, Shusterman notes that "practical somaesthetics" entails practicing psychosomatic disciplines that can improve

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Jun 19, 2015

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