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The Masculine Self in Late Medieval England (review)

The Masculine Self in Late Medieval England (review) Journal of English and Germanic Philology, April 2011 (though Augustine himself would identify that cultural work as belonging to the city of God). For readers who do not share Aers's ontological premises or theological commitments, his arguments thus will not have their intended effect. Of course, Christian apologetics (like any other form of totalizing explanation, whether Marxist, psychoanalytic, or free-market libertarian) may easily explain from within its own closed framework why others reject its tenets. And although it is certainly of some comfort to learn in an endnote that Augustine himself, contrary to the way his arguments were interpreted by medieval canonists, "wholly opposed torture and capital punishment" (thus Henry Chadwick, qtd. p. 185 n. 87), it seems deeply ironic that in defending Augustine's interpretation of Scripture, Aers constantly finds himself needing to police the border between (contingently historical) Christian orthodoxy and heresy. Thus he writes: "In modern liberal societies it is hard for many to imagine how obedience could be a virtue; on the contrary, it tends to be regarded as a mindless or malevolent subjection to tyranny. There can be no question," he goes on to observe, "that obedience has indeed been put to such uses http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JEGP, Journal of English and Germanic Philology University of Illinois Press

The Masculine Self in Late Medieval England (review)

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-662X
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Abstract

Journal of English and Germanic Philology, April 2011 (though Augustine himself would identify that cultural work as belonging to the city of God). For readers who do not share Aers's ontological premises or theological commitments, his arguments thus will not have their intended effect. Of course, Christian apologetics (like any other form of totalizing explanation, whether Marxist, psychoanalytic, or free-market libertarian) may easily explain from within its own closed framework why others reject its tenets. And although it is certainly of some comfort to learn in an endnote that Augustine himself, contrary to the way his arguments were interpreted by medieval canonists, "wholly opposed torture and capital punishment" (thus Henry Chadwick, qtd. p. 185 n. 87), it seems deeply ironic that in defending Augustine's interpretation of Scripture, Aers constantly finds himself needing to police the border between (contingently historical) Christian orthodoxy and heresy. Thus he writes: "In modern liberal societies it is hard for many to imagine how obedience could be a virtue; on the contrary, it tends to be regarded as a mindless or malevolent subjection to tyranny. There can be no question," he goes on to observe, "that obedience has indeed been put to such uses

Journal

JEGP, Journal of English and Germanic PhilologyUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Mar 30, 2011

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