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The Living Body and the Corpse— Israeli Documentary Cinema and the Intifadah

The Living Body and the Corpse— Israeli Documentary Cinema and the Intifadah raya morag Introduction: Bodies That Do Not Matter a consideration of israeli narrative, fictional films produced since the outbreak of the al-Aqsa, or second, Intifadah (2000­ 2004)1 reveals a perplexing phenomenon. Although the majority of Israeli filmmakers identify with the Left, which generally supports the Palestinians and opposes the injustice of the occupation, fictional films never deal with the reality of the occupation. It is denied. Further to this trend, despite the record number of terrorist attacks that took place during those years, most of these films repress the trauma of these attacks.2 There is nothing judgmental in this last observation. On the contrary, according to trauma discourse, repression, or inherent latency, as Caruth calls it (17), is an inevitable, necessary stage in the reaction to trauma. In Israeli narrative cinema, the trauma of the terror attack appears at most in only a few films and then as a sort of distant background to the drama.3 In the only two films produced during these years that portray families in mourning-- Nir Bergman's Broken Wings (2002) and Sabi Gabizon's Nina's Tragedies (2003), both of which met with considerable commercial success--the reason for the mourning, namely, the death of a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

The Living Body and the Corpse— Israeli Documentary Cinema and the Intifadah

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 60 (3-4) – Oct 3, 2008

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
ISSN
1934-6018
Publisher site
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Abstract

raya morag Introduction: Bodies That Do Not Matter a consideration of israeli narrative, fictional films produced since the outbreak of the al-Aqsa, or second, Intifadah (2000­ 2004)1 reveals a perplexing phenomenon. Although the majority of Israeli filmmakers identify with the Left, which generally supports the Palestinians and opposes the injustice of the occupation, fictional films never deal with the reality of the occupation. It is denied. Further to this trend, despite the record number of terrorist attacks that took place during those years, most of these films repress the trauma of these attacks.2 There is nothing judgmental in this last observation. On the contrary, according to trauma discourse, repression, or inherent latency, as Caruth calls it (17), is an inevitable, necessary stage in the reaction to trauma. In Israeli narrative cinema, the trauma of the terror attack appears at most in only a few films and then as a sort of distant background to the drama.3 In the only two films produced during these years that portray families in mourning-- Nir Bergman's Broken Wings (2002) and Sabi Gabizon's Nina's Tragedies (2003), both of which met with considerable commercial success--the reason for the mourning, namely, the death of a

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Oct 3, 2008

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