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Susanne Langer in Focus: The Symbolic Mind by Robert E. Innis (review)

Susanne Langer in Focus: The Symbolic Mind by Robert E. Innis (review) Finally, I share both Neville's appreciation of and concern about postliberal "identity" theologies (some of his teachers were the same as mine). I, too, worry about the "arbitrary" nature of some post-liberal claims and about the ongoing risk of fideism. At the same time, I think that the role of narrative in fixing identity should not obscure its other, potentially truthrevealing functions. Semiosis was a living process for thinkers like Peirce and Royce, with each sign itself becoming an object for subsequent interpretation, so that signs appear in "streams." Both individual and corporate selves (communities) can be accurately portrayed as streams of semiosis, with such portrayals inevitably needing to take on a distinctive narrative form. I share some of Neville's worries about post-liberal theology, but not so much the one that narrative "lends itself " to "arbitrariness" (10). A theologian concerned with generating true interpretations will be unable, it seems to me, to avoid telling certain stories. The remarkable and impressive stream of thought that constitutes Robert Neville's lifework flows through these pages and presses beyond to the workin-progress. I suspect that most readers of Realism in Religion will experience the same admiration mingled with anticipation that I http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

Susanne Langer in Focus: The Symbolic Mind by Robert E. Innis (review)

The Pluralist , Volume 9 (1) – Mar 1, 2014

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University of Illinois Press
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Copyright © University of Illinois Press
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Abstract

Finally, I share both Neville's appreciation of and concern about postliberal "identity" theologies (some of his teachers were the same as mine). I, too, worry about the "arbitrary" nature of some post-liberal claims and about the ongoing risk of fideism. At the same time, I think that the role of narrative in fixing identity should not obscure its other, potentially truthrevealing functions. Semiosis was a living process for thinkers like Peirce and Royce, with each sign itself becoming an object for subsequent interpretation, so that signs appear in "streams." Both individual and corporate selves (communities) can be accurately portrayed as streams of semiosis, with such portrayals inevitably needing to take on a distinctive narrative form. I share some of Neville's worries about post-liberal theology, but not so much the one that narrative "lends itself " to "arbitrariness" (10). A theologian concerned with generating true interpretations will be unable, it seems to me, to avoid telling certain stories. The remarkable and impressive stream of thought that constitutes Robert Neville's lifework flows through these pages and presses beyond to the workin-progress. I suspect that most readers of Realism in Religion will experience the same admiration mingled with anticipation that I

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Mar 1, 2014

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