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Spiegelungen: Zur Kultur der Visualität im Mittelalter (review)

Spiegelungen: Zur Kultur der Visualität im Mittelalter (review) Book Reviews confirm that great medieval works such as Hartmann's romances or Gottfried's Tristan respond to core issues of aristocratic identity in the most complex ways, but the book elucidates at the same time how, for example, the Tristan sequels, the works of Konrad of Würzburg, or the Prose Lancelot fashion narrative responses to similar issues. In this sense, the book is an implicit argument vis-à-vis the current professional unease about how to be a literary historian after the death of literary history. It is at this point that I would confess slight reservations to Müller's approach, but they are lightweight compared to the wealth of insights the book offers. I would argue that literary works respond to pressing cultural issues according to their own inherent semantic principles. These are, as Müller confirms, always historically shaped. Müller's book suggests that the focus on the narrative processing of core passages is indiscriminately appropriate for the analysis of any romance created in the given time period of roughly 120 years. While there are many, notably younger, romances and epics for which this is certainly true, some texts ostensibly occupied with creating overarching structures, such as Hartmann's romances and Wolfram's Parzival, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JEGP, Journal of English and Germanic Philology University of Illinois Press

Spiegelungen: Zur Kultur der Visualität im Mittelalter (review)

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1945-662X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews confirm that great medieval works such as Hartmann's romances or Gottfried's Tristan respond to core issues of aristocratic identity in the most complex ways, but the book elucidates at the same time how, for example, the Tristan sequels, the works of Konrad of Würzburg, or the Prose Lancelot fashion narrative responses to similar issues. In this sense, the book is an implicit argument vis-à-vis the current professional unease about how to be a literary historian after the death of literary history. It is at this point that I would confess slight reservations to Müller's approach, but they are lightweight compared to the wealth of insights the book offers. I would argue that literary works respond to pressing cultural issues according to their own inherent semantic principles. These are, as Müller confirms, always historically shaped. Müller's book suggests that the focus on the narrative processing of core passages is indiscriminately appropriate for the analysis of any romance created in the given time period of roughly 120 years. While there are many, notably younger, romances and epics for which this is certainly true, some texts ostensibly occupied with creating overarching structures, such as Hartmann's romances and Wolfram's Parzival,

Journal

JEGP, Journal of English and Germanic PhilologyUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Mar 30, 2011

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