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Small Media, Global Media: Kino and the Microcinema Movement

Small Media, Global Media: Kino and the Microcinema Movement kyle conway at a 1991 conference on the future of the media in Québec, journalism professor Florian Sauvageau cited a prediction made a decade earlier by Gérard Barbin, president of RadioQuébec: "In the future, there will be very big media and very small media" (9).1 More than twenty-five years later, Barbin's observation seems prescient. For years, political economists have been warning us about the nefarious effects of a situation where fewer and fewer companies--in other words, big media--control more and more of the media content we consume (e.g., Herman and McChesney; Miller). They explain that capitalism is premised on growth, which leads media companies to take over competitors and seek out new audiences. The rise of global media, they contend, is the logical outcome of capitalism's need for expansion. However, the idea of small media, though evocative, is rather ambiguous. It clearly stands in opposition to big media, but how? Writing about the role of technology in education in the 1970s, Wilbur Schramm distinguished between "Big Media" as "complex, expensive media like television, sound films, and computer-assisted instruction" and "Little Media" as "the simpler ones, which stretch all the way from slides, slide films, and projected transparencies to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

Small Media, Global Media: Kino and the Microcinema Movement

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 60 (3-4) – Oct 3, 2008

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
ISSN
1934-6018
Publisher site
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Abstract

kyle conway at a 1991 conference on the future of the media in Québec, journalism professor Florian Sauvageau cited a prediction made a decade earlier by Gérard Barbin, president of RadioQuébec: "In the future, there will be very big media and very small media" (9).1 More than twenty-five years later, Barbin's observation seems prescient. For years, political economists have been warning us about the nefarious effects of a situation where fewer and fewer companies--in other words, big media--control more and more of the media content we consume (e.g., Herman and McChesney; Miller). They explain that capitalism is premised on growth, which leads media companies to take over competitors and seek out new audiences. The rise of global media, they contend, is the logical outcome of capitalism's need for expansion. However, the idea of small media, though evocative, is rather ambiguous. It clearly stands in opposition to big media, but how? Writing about the role of technology in education in the 1970s, Wilbur Schramm distinguished between "Big Media" as "complex, expensive media like television, sound films, and computer-assisted instruction" and "Little Media" as "the simpler ones, which stretch all the way from slides, slide films, and projected transparencies to

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Oct 3, 2008

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