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Schopenhauer on Sense Perception and Aesthetic Cognition

Schopenhauer on Sense Perception and Aesthetic Cognition BART Introduction In Schopenhauer's view, the whole organic and inorganic world is ultimately governed by an insatiable, blind will. Life as a whole is purposeless: there is no ultimate goal or meaning, for the metaphysical will is only interested in manifesting itself in (or as) a myriad of phenomena, which we call the "world" or "life." Human life, too, is nothing but an insignificant product or "objectivation" of the blind, unconscious will, and because our life is determined by willing (that is, by needs, affects, urges, and desires), and since willing is characterized by lack, our life is essentially full of misery and suffering. We are constantly searching for objects that can satisfy our needs and desires; once we have finally found a way to satisfy one desire, another one crops up, and we become restless willing subjects once again, and so on in an endless whirlpool of willing, suffering, momentary satisfaction, boredom, willing again, etc. Life is not a good thing. The only way, Schopenhauer argues, to escape from these torments of willing is by "seeing the world aright," as Wittgenstein would have it: that is, by acknowledging the pointlessness and insignificance of our own willing existence http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Aesthetic Education University of Illinois Press

Schopenhauer on Sense Perception and Aesthetic Cognition

The Journal of Aesthetic Education , Volume 45 (1) – Feb 10, 2011

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
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Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1543-7809
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Abstract

BART Introduction In Schopenhauer's view, the whole organic and inorganic world is ultimately governed by an insatiable, blind will. Life as a whole is purposeless: there is no ultimate goal or meaning, for the metaphysical will is only interested in manifesting itself in (or as) a myriad of phenomena, which we call the "world" or "life." Human life, too, is nothing but an insignificant product or "objectivation" of the blind, unconscious will, and because our life is determined by willing (that is, by needs, affects, urges, and desires), and since willing is characterized by lack, our life is essentially full of misery and suffering. We are constantly searching for objects that can satisfy our needs and desires; once we have finally found a way to satisfy one desire, another one crops up, and we become restless willing subjects once again, and so on in an endless whirlpool of willing, suffering, momentary satisfaction, boredom, willing again, etc. Life is not a good thing. The only way, Schopenhauer argues, to escape from these torments of willing is by "seeing the world aright," as Wittgenstein would have it: that is, by acknowledging the pointlessness and insignificance of our own willing existence

Journal

The Journal of Aesthetic EducationUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Feb 10, 2011

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