Royce's Reinvention of Meister Eckhart

Royce's Reinvention of Meister Eckhart david k. glidden University of California, Riverside Having been set free from sin, You have become slaves of righteousness. —Rom. 6.18 Beginning with The Religious Aspect of Philosophy (1885), Josiah Royce’s views gradually evolved into a growing celebration of community affiliations. Philosophy of Loyalty (1908) eloquently articulated his distinctive social philosophy.1 Royce’s vision of ideal community life soon became beatified in The Problem of Christianity (1913) in the form of “the Beloved Community,” where Royce venerated the Pauline model of a gathered community consisting of those who share a common faith. Heartfelt community loyalty thereby acquired a spiritual dimension that transformed human nature. Against the background of this transfiguration, Royce downplayed the life of prayer and private devotion to Jesus as personal savior. Instead, Royce emphasized the Divine presence emanating from within the community of the faithful. This marked the spiritual apotheosis of Royce’s social philosophy. From this perspective, Royce belittled what he termed “quietism,” where the devout turn away from the centrality of community life, by surrendering their persons to God, abandoning their individuality as well. “Quietism” came into popular parlance only toward the end of the seventeenth century in response to the mysticism of the Spanish http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

Royce's Reinvention of Meister Eckhart

The Pluralist, Volume 12 – Jul 20, 2017

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
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Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1944-6489
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Abstract

david k. glidden University of California, Riverside Having been set free from sin, You have become slaves of righteousness. —Rom. 6.18 Beginning with The Religious Aspect of Philosophy (1885), Josiah Royce’s views gradually evolved into a growing celebration of community affiliations. Philosophy of Loyalty (1908) eloquently articulated his distinctive social philosophy.1 Royce’s vision of ideal community life soon became beatified in The Problem of Christianity (1913) in the form of “the Beloved Community,” where Royce venerated the Pauline model of a gathered community consisting of those who share a common faith. Heartfelt community loyalty thereby acquired a spiritual dimension that transformed human nature. Against the background of this transfiguration, Royce downplayed the life of prayer and private devotion to Jesus as personal savior. Instead, Royce emphasized the Divine presence emanating from within the community of the faithful. This marked the spiritual apotheosis of Royce’s social philosophy. From this perspective, Royce belittled what he termed “quietism,” where the devout turn away from the centrality of community life, by surrendering their persons to God, abandoning their individuality as well. “Quietism” came into popular parlance only toward the end of the seventeenth century in response to the mysticism of the Spanish

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Jul 20, 2017

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