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Responses to Dwayne Tunstall and Lewis V. Baldwin

Responses to Dwayne Tunstall and Lewis V. Baldwin Responses to Dwayne Tunstall and Lewis V. Baldwin rufus burrow, jr. Christian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis, IN this has been an excellent opportunity for me to get a sense of what scholars in e fi lds other than my own (viz., theological social ethics) think I am trying to do, and whether there might be some sense in it. But in all honesty, I must say that the experience of reading and pondering the articles by Lewis Baldwin and Dwayne Tunstall in this issue of The Pluralist has been both enlightening and a joy, inasmuch as it has been an opportunity for me to find out what I have been doing in the academy for the last twenty-five years and where might be some of the limitations as well as promise in my work. When I read these articles, I recalled an experience that second-generation personalist Francis J. McConnell reported in his biography on Borden P. Bowne (1847–1910), the father of American personalism. During his student days in Germany, Bowne studied under Rudolph Hermann Lotze. In a num- ber of Bowne’s early books, he acknowledged his indebtedness to Lotze. But what impressed me even more was Lotze’s appreciation for Bowne’s http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

Responses to Dwayne Tunstall and Lewis V. Baldwin

The Pluralist , Volume 6 – Mar 18, 2011

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
ISSN
1944-6489

Abstract

Responses to Dwayne Tunstall and Lewis V. Baldwin rufus burrow, jr. Christian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis, IN this has been an excellent opportunity for me to get a sense of what scholars in e fi lds other than my own (viz., theological social ethics) think I am trying to do, and whether there might be some sense in it. But in all honesty, I must say that the experience of reading and pondering the articles by Lewis Baldwin and Dwayne Tunstall in this issue of The Pluralist has been both enlightening and a joy, inasmuch as it has been an opportunity for me to find out what I have been doing in the academy for the last twenty-five years and where might be some of the limitations as well as promise in my work. When I read these articles, I recalled an experience that second-generation personalist Francis J. McConnell reported in his biography on Borden P. Bowne (1847–1910), the father of American personalism. During his student days in Germany, Bowne studied under Rudolph Hermann Lotze. In a num- ber of Bowne’s early books, he acknowledged his indebtedness to Lotze. But what impressed me even more was Lotze’s appreciation for Bowne’s

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Mar 18, 2011

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