Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Reflective Subjects in Kant and Architectural Design Education

Reflective Subjects in Kant and Architectural Design Education PEG Introduction In architectural design education, students develop drawing, conceptual, and critical skills that are informed by their ability to reflect upon the production of ideas in design processes and in the urban, environmental, social, historical, and cultural contexts that define architecture and the built environment. Students' ability to critically engage in the discipline is partly generated by their powers of reflective thinking--for example, when they learn to actively reflect upon processes of design and, in turn, to transform these aesthetic judgments into embodied "knowledges" in the production of the built environment. Reflective actions and thinking, therefore, are inherent in the education of the architectural designer and in the individual student's experience of inhabiting the built environment. This article explores these reflective modes of production in order to challenge the determinism in spatial thinking that persists in formalist approaches to architectural theory and design. First, it argues that reflective thinking informs the activities that generate the design process in its various stages of development, beginning from the production of the "authored" drawing, model, render, film, or proto-type, to the spaces of explanation and reflection that structure the design tutorial, review, or "crit." In addition, these pedagogical experiences preview http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Aesthetic Education University of Illinois Press

Reflective Subjects in Kant and Architectural Design Education

The Journal of Aesthetic Education , Volume 41 (1) – Feb 20, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-illinois-press/reflective-subjects-in-kant-and-architectural-design-education-r0dMce0hTK
Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1543-7809
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PEG Introduction In architectural design education, students develop drawing, conceptual, and critical skills that are informed by their ability to reflect upon the production of ideas in design processes and in the urban, environmental, social, historical, and cultural contexts that define architecture and the built environment. Students' ability to critically engage in the discipline is partly generated by their powers of reflective thinking--for example, when they learn to actively reflect upon processes of design and, in turn, to transform these aesthetic judgments into embodied "knowledges" in the production of the built environment. Reflective actions and thinking, therefore, are inherent in the education of the architectural designer and in the individual student's experience of inhabiting the built environment. This article explores these reflective modes of production in order to challenge the determinism in spatial thinking that persists in formalist approaches to architectural theory and design. First, it argues that reflective thinking informs the activities that generate the design process in its various stages of development, beginning from the production of the "authored" drawing, model, render, film, or proto-type, to the spaces of explanation and reflection that structure the design tutorial, review, or "crit." In addition, these pedagogical experiences preview

Journal

The Journal of Aesthetic EducationUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Feb 20, 2007

There are no references for this article.