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Recognizing the Epistemic Role of Experience in Ethics: Reflections Inspired by Putnam, McDowell, Wittgenstein, and Dewey

Recognizing the Epistemic Role of Experience in Ethics: Reflections Inspired by Putnam, McDowell,... peter j. tumulty Saint Michael's College, Vermont Introduction Standard, or ordinary, modern philosophy, with its inadequately examined assumption of what amounts to a Cartesian-inspired epistemological stance accompanied today with materialist reductionist patterns of seeing and thinking, presents significant obstacles to recognizing the cognitive force of the diverse experiences that arise within and are made possible by our need and interest-based practices whose roots lie in our bio-social nature.1 This denial of epistemic value to experience has negative consequences in general but particularly for understanding the ethical dimension of our lives, not the least being learning what is required to foster our ethical maturation in a pluralistic world.2 At a general level, and argued in the text below, among the criteria for the presence of conditions that foster the maturation of abilities of ethical perception, reflection, and practically wise action is the extent well-reasoned appeals to an informed conscience can effectively function as an alternative, enlightened, sustained force in human affairs countering the destructive effects of ignorance, prejudice, and distorted loyalties. Enlarging the range in which reason's force can make a difference is all the more critical in an age of globalization, with its accompanying intensification of cultural clashes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

Recognizing the Epistemic Role of Experience in Ethics: Reflections Inspired by Putnam, McDowell, Wittgenstein, and Dewey

The Pluralist , Volume 10 (2) – Jun 19, 2015

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
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Copyright © University of Illinois Press
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1944-6489
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Abstract

peter j. tumulty Saint Michael's College, Vermont Introduction Standard, or ordinary, modern philosophy, with its inadequately examined assumption of what amounts to a Cartesian-inspired epistemological stance accompanied today with materialist reductionist patterns of seeing and thinking, presents significant obstacles to recognizing the cognitive force of the diverse experiences that arise within and are made possible by our need and interest-based practices whose roots lie in our bio-social nature.1 This denial of epistemic value to experience has negative consequences in general but particularly for understanding the ethical dimension of our lives, not the least being learning what is required to foster our ethical maturation in a pluralistic world.2 At a general level, and argued in the text below, among the criteria for the presence of conditions that foster the maturation of abilities of ethical perception, reflection, and practically wise action is the extent well-reasoned appeals to an informed conscience can effectively function as an alternative, enlightened, sustained force in human affairs countering the destructive effects of ignorance, prejudice, and distorted loyalties. Enlarging the range in which reason's force can make a difference is all the more critical in an age of globalization, with its accompanying intensification of cultural clashes.

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Jun 19, 2015

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