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Possibilities in a Neoliberal World: Masculine Authority and Love in Affliction

Possibilities in a Neoliberal World: Masculine Authority and Love in Affliction Possibilities in a Neoliberal World: Masculine Authority and Love in Affliction stacy denton the critique of neoliberalism that has been taken up in the 2000s, at least by prominent scholars in academia, highlights the impact of changing socioeconomic structures on people and communities. David Harvey defines neoliberalism as “a theory of political economic practices that proposes that human well-being can best be advanced by liberating individual entrepreneurial freedoms and skills within an institutional framework characterized by strong private property rights, free markets, and free trade,” leading to the colonization of people and places so that the few can perpetu­ ally accumulate at the expense of the majority (Brief History of Neoliberalism 2–3). For many critics of this system, the difference between neoliberalism and earlier capitalist ideologies is that it seems to “have brought the logic of the market to bear on seemingly every facet of social life, rather than just economic life . . .” (Braedly and Luxton 7). Indeed, films such as Affliction (1998) highlight the extent to which neoliberalism impacts the ways that individu­ als and communities see themselves and their potential, whether this potential is measured economically or on a deeply personal level. Within a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

Possibilities in a Neoliberal World: Masculine Authority and Love in Affliction

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 69 (3) – Aug 30, 2017

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1934-6018
Publisher site
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Abstract

Possibilities in a Neoliberal World: Masculine Authority and Love in Affliction stacy denton the critique of neoliberalism that has been taken up in the 2000s, at least by prominent scholars in academia, highlights the impact of changing socioeconomic structures on people and communities. David Harvey defines neoliberalism as “a theory of political economic practices that proposes that human well-being can best be advanced by liberating individual entrepreneurial freedoms and skills within an institutional framework characterized by strong private property rights, free markets, and free trade,” leading to the colonization of people and places so that the few can perpetu­ ally accumulate at the expense of the majority (Brief History of Neoliberalism 2–3). For many critics of this system, the difference between neoliberalism and earlier capitalist ideologies is that it seems to “have brought the logic of the market to bear on seemingly every facet of social life, rather than just economic life . . .” (Braedly and Luxton 7). Indeed, films such as Affliction (1998) highlight the extent to which neoliberalism impacts the ways that individu­ als and communities see themselves and their potential, whether this potential is measured economically or on a deeply personal level. Within a

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Aug 30, 2017

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