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Pluralism: The Future of Religion by Kenneth Rose (review)

Pluralism: The Future of Religion by Kenneth Rose (review) View,” makes visible the ways Whitehead’s process cosmology, with its notions of conceptual reversion, can push pragmatic insights in directions that would render them more helpful when it comes to science generally and evolution in particular. Similarly, Nicholas Gaskill argues that Whitehead’s aesthetic ontology reframes our understanding of beauty in ways that extend Dewey’s arguments in Art as Experience. On Whitehead’s view, the pursuit of beauty is not just a human endeavor, it is a cosmic affair. The volume ends with two chapters that provide a glimpse of what it is like to think creatively about philosophical problems from a point of view inspired by both Whiteheadian and pragmatic insights. In a beautiful essay, Vincent Colapietro develops a novel description of the way trauma creates nodes of resistance and preoccupation that interrupt the flow of experience. Pulling directly from James and Whitehead, Colapietro views life as a continual struggle to overcome traumatic experiences by regaining a “flow of feeling” that acknowledges and preserves rather than represses those interruptions. Jude Jones brings Thinking with Whitehead to a close with her meditation on Whitehead’s famous phrase “It never really is.” As Jones sees it, Whitehead’s language of perpetual perishing erases http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Theology & Philosophy University of Illinois Press

Pluralism: The Future of Religion by Kenneth Rose (review)

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
2156-4795
Publisher site
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Abstract

View,” makes visible the ways Whitehead’s process cosmology, with its notions of conceptual reversion, can push pragmatic insights in directions that would render them more helpful when it comes to science generally and evolution in particular. Similarly, Nicholas Gaskill argues that Whitehead’s aesthetic ontology reframes our understanding of beauty in ways that extend Dewey’s arguments in Art as Experience. On Whitehead’s view, the pursuit of beauty is not just a human endeavor, it is a cosmic affair. The volume ends with two chapters that provide a glimpse of what it is like to think creatively about philosophical problems from a point of view inspired by both Whiteheadian and pragmatic insights. In a beautiful essay, Vincent Colapietro develops a novel description of the way trauma creates nodes of resistance and preoccupation that interrupt the flow of experience. Pulling directly from James and Whitehead, Colapietro views life as a continual struggle to overcome traumatic experiences by regaining a “flow of feeling” that acknowledges and preserves rather than represses those interruptions. Jude Jones brings Thinking with Whitehead to a close with her meditation on Whitehead’s famous phrase “It never really is.” As Jones sees it, Whitehead’s language of perpetual perishing erases

Journal

American Journal of Theology & PhilosophyUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Oct 30, 2017

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