Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Placental Social Ethics: Designing for Epistemologies of Resistance

Placental Social Ethics: Designing for Epistemologies of Resistance Placental Social Ethics: Designing for Epistemologies of Resistance celia t. bardwell-jones University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo i t h a nk dr. v ink for her impressive analysis of design and introducing me to another method in thinking about institutional organization. I also am deeply grateful for Dr. Vink’s engagement with my work on “Placental Eth- ics: Addressing Colonial Legacies and Imagining Culturally Safe Responses to Health Care in Hawaiʻi” (Bardwell-Jones) and responding to the call to re-envision alternative design models in guiding institutional operations that seek community engagement. Responding to this paper helped me to think further about the work I began in that article. Dr. Vink’s project carefully reflects on her experience working with com - munities in Canada on behalf of hospital administration. Seeking input from differently situated communities, she reflects on moments of perplexity and resistance from the community members. Working with members from an Indigenous community, she found that dominant design models “can contrib- ute to the reproduction of coloniality and modernity.” Working with diverse communities in Toronto, she acknowledged the “hypocrisy” of participation when dominant design models failed to acknowledge the ongoing process of local design work within the community. It appears that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

Placental Social Ethics: Designing for Epistemologies of Resistance

The Pluralist , Volume 17 – Feb 26, 2022

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-illinois-press/placental-social-ethics-designing-for-epistemologies-of-resistance-IbuLwG4TVj
Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
ISSN
1944-6489

Abstract

Placental Social Ethics: Designing for Epistemologies of Resistance celia t. bardwell-jones University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo i t h a nk dr. v ink for her impressive analysis of design and introducing me to another method in thinking about institutional organization. I also am deeply grateful for Dr. Vink’s engagement with my work on “Placental Eth- ics: Addressing Colonial Legacies and Imagining Culturally Safe Responses to Health Care in Hawaiʻi” (Bardwell-Jones) and responding to the call to re-envision alternative design models in guiding institutional operations that seek community engagement. Responding to this paper helped me to think further about the work I began in that article. Dr. Vink’s project carefully reflects on her experience working with com - munities in Canada on behalf of hospital administration. Seeking input from differently situated communities, she reflects on moments of perplexity and resistance from the community members. Working with members from an Indigenous community, she found that dominant design models “can contrib- ute to the reproduction of coloniality and modernity.” Working with diverse communities in Toronto, she acknowledged the “hypocrisy” of participation when dominant design models failed to acknowledge the ongoing process of local design work within the community. It appears that

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Feb 26, 2022

There are no references for this article.