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Painting "Out of the Lines": The Aesthetics of Politics and Politics of Aesthetics in Children's Art

Painting "Out of the Lines": The Aesthetics of Politics and Politics of Aesthetics in... <p>Abstract:</p><p>Historically, the study of children&apos;s art has been predominantly constructed on developmental capacities, graphic sophistication, and particular styles conceived by adults. Although these theories of classification were developed with the best of intentions, fashioned for a better understanding of young people&apos;s art, they often simplify and decontextualize the lives and works of children. Children&apos;s art, however, is a complex matter, one that is entangled with both adults&apos; and children&apos;s presumptions, practices, and expectations. Attending to this complexity, this article explores how young children engage in art as political subjects who participate in, disagree with, and negotiate between adults&apos; expectations and their own desires. In doing so, I draw on philosopher Jacques Rancière&apos;s homologous yet differentiated ideas of "politics" and "aesthetics," along with a painting activity of two 5-year-old boys in a kindergarten classroom, where the tensions involved with "going out of the lines" were continuously communicated during the art making.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Visual Arts Research University of Illinois Press

Painting "Out of the Lines": The Aesthetics of Politics and Politics of Aesthetics in Children&apos;s Art

Visual Arts Research , Volume 45 (2) – Dec 16, 2019

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © the Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
ISSN
2151-8009

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>Historically, the study of children&apos;s art has been predominantly constructed on developmental capacities, graphic sophistication, and particular styles conceived by adults. Although these theories of classification were developed with the best of intentions, fashioned for a better understanding of young people&apos;s art, they often simplify and decontextualize the lives and works of children. Children&apos;s art, however, is a complex matter, one that is entangled with both adults&apos; and children&apos;s presumptions, practices, and expectations. Attending to this complexity, this article explores how young children engage in art as political subjects who participate in, disagree with, and negotiate between adults&apos; expectations and their own desires. In doing so, I draw on philosopher Jacques Rancière&apos;s homologous yet differentiated ideas of "politics" and "aesthetics," along with a painting activity of two 5-year-old boys in a kindergarten classroom, where the tensions involved with "going out of the lines" were continuously communicated during the art making.</p>

Journal

Visual Arts ResearchUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Dec 16, 2019

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