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Ontology and Emotion in Reflexive Design Practices

Ontology and Emotion in Reflexive Design Practices Ontology and Emotion in Reflexive Design Practices shannon sullivan University of North Carolina at Charlotte i a m ple ased to h av e the opportunit y to respond to Josina Vink’s rich paper on “Designing for Plurality in Democracy by Building Reflexivity.” Vink suggests that design has its roots in pragmatism and that by returning to them, design can improve itself by becoming more pluralistic and less colonizing in its effects. Focusing on health care systems in particular, Vink emphasizes reflexivity as crucial for the decolonizing of design. As Vink ar - gues, reflexivity can help cultivate epistemic humility on the part of design - ers, acknowledge the important role of embodiment in design practices and outcomes, reject allegedly universal approaches to solving design problems, and recognize that the tools of design are not value-neutral. Because of time constraints—and the wealth of insights and examples provided in Vink’s paper—I will limit my response to two particular concepts that are important to Vink’s analysis: (i) the uncommons, and (ii) ontological occupation. These concepts are important in their own right, and they also are interestingly related to one another through a kind of opposition. Both are spatialized ways of thinking http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

Ontology and Emotion in Reflexive Design Practices

The Pluralist , Volume 17 – Feb 26, 2022

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
ISSN
1944-6489

Abstract

Ontology and Emotion in Reflexive Design Practices shannon sullivan University of North Carolina at Charlotte i a m ple ased to h av e the opportunit y to respond to Josina Vink’s rich paper on “Designing for Plurality in Democracy by Building Reflexivity.” Vink suggests that design has its roots in pragmatism and that by returning to them, design can improve itself by becoming more pluralistic and less colonizing in its effects. Focusing on health care systems in particular, Vink emphasizes reflexivity as crucial for the decolonizing of design. As Vink ar - gues, reflexivity can help cultivate epistemic humility on the part of design - ers, acknowledge the important role of embodiment in design practices and outcomes, reject allegedly universal approaches to solving design problems, and recognize that the tools of design are not value-neutral. Because of time constraints—and the wealth of insights and examples provided in Vink’s paper—I will limit my response to two particular concepts that are important to Vink’s analysis: (i) the uncommons, and (ii) ontological occupation. These concepts are important in their own right, and they also are interestingly related to one another through a kind of opposition. Both are spatialized ways of thinking

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Feb 26, 2022

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