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New Immigrant, Old Story: Framing Russians on the Israeli Screen

New Immigrant, Old Story: Framing Russians on the Israeli Screen olga gershenson and dale hudson following the coll apse of the soviet union, nearly two million people escaped the former empire to pursue new lives in Israel, the United States, Germany, and other countries. By the mid-1990s, the "new Russian immigrant" had begun to emerge as a character in both commercial and art-house cinema in these countries.1 Because cinematic representations of immigrants often reveal more about the cultures producing and consuming such images and narratives than they do about actual immigrant experiences, the Russian immigrant character points to particular national responses to new waves of immigration at the onset of post­Cold War globalization, reflecting gendered, ethnic, and religious contradictions and inconsistencies within popular conceptions of national identity. In this article, we examine films about female Russian immigrants to Israel as sites of debates over nation and integration olga gershenson is an assistant professor of Judaic and Near Eastern studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She is the author of Gesher: Russian Theatre in Israel; A Study of Cultural Colonization (Peter Lang, 2005) and coeditor of Ladies and Gents: Public Toilets and Gender (Temple University Press, forthcoming). dale hudson is a visiting assistant professor of film studies in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

New Immigrant, Old Story: Framing Russians on the Israeli Screen

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 60 (3-4) – Oct 3, 2008

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
ISSN
1934-6018
Publisher site
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Abstract

olga gershenson and dale hudson following the coll apse of the soviet union, nearly two million people escaped the former empire to pursue new lives in Israel, the United States, Germany, and other countries. By the mid-1990s, the "new Russian immigrant" had begun to emerge as a character in both commercial and art-house cinema in these countries.1 Because cinematic representations of immigrants often reveal more about the cultures producing and consuming such images and narratives than they do about actual immigrant experiences, the Russian immigrant character points to particular national responses to new waves of immigration at the onset of post­Cold War globalization, reflecting gendered, ethnic, and religious contradictions and inconsistencies within popular conceptions of national identity. In this article, we examine films about female Russian immigrants to Israel as sites of debates over nation and integration olga gershenson is an assistant professor of Judaic and Near Eastern studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She is the author of Gesher: Russian Theatre in Israel; A Study of Cultural Colonization (Peter Lang, 2005) and coeditor of Ladies and Gents: Public Toilets and Gender (Temple University Press, forthcoming). dale hudson is a visiting assistant professor of film studies in

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Oct 3, 2008

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