Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Museum Education and the Project of Interpretation in the Twenty-First Century

Museum Education and the Project of Interpretation in the Twenty-First Century The Future of the Art Museum not been previously, and it is interesting to consider how the salon might have been a foretaste and promise of what was to come with the establishment of the Louvre as a public museum, as Carrier suggests (210). At the same time, the salon, to which Carrier points as a model for public participation in lively dialogue about art, was an exhibition of contemporary art that was not hung in any sort of chronology for it lacked one. Given Carrier's focus on "old art," I do not find the salon germane to his argument. Carrier, Museum Skepticism, 211. Ibid. Ibid., 15-16. Most museums I know have collections in excess of their gallery size. Therefore, many quality works of art languish in storage because the public spaces are already filled to capacity. Carrier, Museum Skepticism, 224. Ibid., 16. Museum Education and the Project of Interpretation in the Twenty-First Century This is what we shall look for as we move: freedom developed by human beings who have acted to make a space for themselves in the presence of others, human beings become "challengers" ready for alternatives, alternatives that include caring and community. And we http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Aesthetic Education University of Illinois Press

Museum Education and the Project of Interpretation in the Twenty-First Century

The Journal of Aesthetic Education , Volume 41 (2) – Jun 2, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-illinois-press/museum-education-and-the-project-of-interpretation-in-the-twenty-first-5irDcyezzg
Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1543-7809
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Future of the Art Museum not been previously, and it is interesting to consider how the salon might have been a foretaste and promise of what was to come with the establishment of the Louvre as a public museum, as Carrier suggests (210). At the same time, the salon, to which Carrier points as a model for public participation in lively dialogue about art, was an exhibition of contemporary art that was not hung in any sort of chronology for it lacked one. Given Carrier's focus on "old art," I do not find the salon germane to his argument. Carrier, Museum Skepticism, 211. Ibid. Ibid., 15-16. Most museums I know have collections in excess of their gallery size. Therefore, many quality works of art languish in storage because the public spaces are already filled to capacity. Carrier, Museum Skepticism, 224. Ibid., 16. Museum Education and the Project of Interpretation in the Twenty-First Century This is what we shall look for as we move: freedom developed by human beings who have acted to make a space for themselves in the presence of others, human beings become "challengers" ready for alternatives, alternatives that include caring and community. And we

Journal

The Journal of Aesthetic EducationUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Jun 2, 2007

There are no references for this article.