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Milland Alone: The End of the System, Post-Studio Stardom, and the Total Auteur

Milland Alone: The End of the System, Post-Studio Stardom, and the Total Auteur Milland Alone: The End of the System, Post-Studio Stardom, and the Total Auteur brooks e. hefner After all these years I finally realized that the only thing I ever wanted to be in this business was a director. —Ray Milland (256) despite its many complic ations and creates “interior meaning” through his struggle qual ific ations since the late Andrew Sar­ with studio assignments (“Notes” 7). ris introduced it to American readers in 1962, The post­ studio era, however, poses a dif­ the “auteur theory” remains a central concern ferent problem, even though the very notion in film and media studies. Film festivals and of the auteur emerged during this time. Fol­ art house programs continue to be organized lowing the end of dominant studio practices around the auteur, and scholarly monographs such as block booking and vertical integration, and essays still largely attribute authorial inten­ a change initiated by the US Supreme Court’s tion to directors. Rather than embracing the 1948 decision in the Paramount case, the rise new independent era of 1950s and 60s US film, of independent production saw the emergence however, Sarris’s influential mistranslation of of the star­ director or star­ producer and, later, the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

Milland Alone: The End of the System, Post-Studio Stardom, and the Total Auteur

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 66 (4) – Nov 27, 2014

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1934-6018

Abstract

Milland Alone: The End of the System, Post-Studio Stardom, and the Total Auteur brooks e. hefner After all these years I finally realized that the only thing I ever wanted to be in this business was a director. —Ray Milland (256) despite its many complic ations and creates “interior meaning” through his struggle qual ific ations since the late Andrew Sar­ with studio assignments (“Notes” 7). ris introduced it to American readers in 1962, The post­ studio era, however, poses a dif­ the “auteur theory” remains a central concern ferent problem, even though the very notion in film and media studies. Film festivals and of the auteur emerged during this time. Fol­ art house programs continue to be organized lowing the end of dominant studio practices around the auteur, and scholarly monographs such as block booking and vertical integration, and essays still largely attribute authorial inten­ a change initiated by the US Supreme Court’s tion to directors. Rather than embracing the 1948 decision in the Paramount case, the rise new independent era of 1950s and 60s US film, of independent production saw the emergence however, Sarris’s influential mistranslation of of the star­ director or star­ producer and, later, the

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Nov 27, 2014

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