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Means Without End: Production, Reception, and Teaching in Kant's Aesthetics

Means Without End: Production, Reception, and Teaching in Kant's Aesthetics The Work of Art If aesthetics is to have a role within an art school context, it must be able to engage with the work of art as an ongoing and ontologically open productive enterprise. The reception of the artwork as a completed thing or act and the aesthetic judgment necessary to take pleasure in the contemplation of it is largely irrelevant to the day-to-day work of the artist in the studio or onsite. Rarely do the tutor or student stand before a work that could be claimed to have reached completion or achieved what might be called "finality." On the contrary, in most cases an essential aspect of teaching practice is precisely to resist the impending closure of the work through a critical engagement which challenges the student to consider and reconsider the aesthetic possibilities of given forms within a situation of infinite reflection. Given this, it is important at the outset to consider Kant's notion of finality without end. So we may at least observe a finality of form, and trace it in objects -- though by reflection only -- without resting it on an end....Whenever an end is regarded as a source of delight, it http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Aesthetic Education University of Illinois Press

Means Without End: Production, Reception, and Teaching in Kant's Aesthetics

The Journal of Aesthetic Education , Volume 38 (1) – Feb 20, 2004

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1543-7809
Publisher site
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Abstract

The Work of Art If aesthetics is to have a role within an art school context, it must be able to engage with the work of art as an ongoing and ontologically open productive enterprise. The reception of the artwork as a completed thing or act and the aesthetic judgment necessary to take pleasure in the contemplation of it is largely irrelevant to the day-to-day work of the artist in the studio or onsite. Rarely do the tutor or student stand before a work that could be claimed to have reached completion or achieved what might be called "finality." On the contrary, in most cases an essential aspect of teaching practice is precisely to resist the impending closure of the work through a critical engagement which challenges the student to consider and reconsider the aesthetic possibilities of given forms within a situation of infinite reflection. Given this, it is important at the outset to consider Kant's notion of finality without end. So we may at least observe a finality of form, and trace it in objects -- though by reflection only -- without resting it on an end....Whenever an end is regarded as a source of delight, it

Journal

The Journal of Aesthetic EducationUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Feb 20, 2004

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