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McDermott's Salvation: Turning and Returning

McDermott's Salvation: Turning and Returning McDermott’s Salvation: Turning and Returning roger ward Georgetown College Nothing is easier than self-deceit. For what each man wishes he also believes to be true. —Demosthenes, Third Olynthiac the pr agm atic and gospel adage that you can judge a tree by its fruits is especially apt for John J. McDermott. The fruits of extraordinary and prolific scholarship are second only to his extraordinary and prolific teaching. Mc- Dermott’s place in American philosophy, and his making American philoso- phy his place, gathers vitality from the texts of James, Dewey, and Royce he has opened through the mantra of experience that reflects the existentialists, urban living, problems of education, and radical aesthetic sensibility. McDer- mott just sees the world and philosophy from a unique angle, an American angle, an angle we can only approximate looking over his shoulder. As James Campbell points out, what McDermott includes in his anthologies of James, Dewey, and Royce is as interesting as what he chooses to exclude (See Camp- bell and Hart 34). Over the course of a long career, McDermott exhibits a striking control of both his texts and the texts he responds to, even though he claims that he does not attend http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

McDermott's Salvation: Turning and Returning

The Pluralist , Volume 6 – Mar 18, 2011

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
ISSN
1944-6489

Abstract

McDermott’s Salvation: Turning and Returning roger ward Georgetown College Nothing is easier than self-deceit. For what each man wishes he also believes to be true. —Demosthenes, Third Olynthiac the pr agm atic and gospel adage that you can judge a tree by its fruits is especially apt for John J. McDermott. The fruits of extraordinary and prolific scholarship are second only to his extraordinary and prolific teaching. Mc- Dermott’s place in American philosophy, and his making American philoso- phy his place, gathers vitality from the texts of James, Dewey, and Royce he has opened through the mantra of experience that reflects the existentialists, urban living, problems of education, and radical aesthetic sensibility. McDer- mott just sees the world and philosophy from a unique angle, an American angle, an angle we can only approximate looking over his shoulder. As James Campbell points out, what McDermott includes in his anthologies of James, Dewey, and Royce is as interesting as what he chooses to exclude (See Camp- bell and Hart 34). Over the course of a long career, McDermott exhibits a striking control of both his texts and the texts he responds to, even though he claims that he does not attend

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Mar 18, 2011

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