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Looking to Learn: Museum Educators and Aesthetic Education

Looking to Learn: Museum Educators and Aesthetic Education NANCY BLUME, JEAN HENNING, AMY HERMAN, AND NANCY RICHNER Introduction Museum education. Aesthetic education. How are they similar? How do they differ? How do they relate to each other? What are their goals? As museum educators working with classroom and art teachers, we are often asked these questions, and we ask them ourselves. "What do you DO?" is probably the most frequently asked question of all, and the answer is complex. Even more complex is how these questions relate to the Rembrandt Project. Given that looking at original works of art is such a priority for museums and museum educators, how do we address the project's reliance on technology? And how do these questions relate to the social studies and visual arts standards, Nancy Blume is head of arts education at Asia Society, where she has worked since 1989. She is responsible for the docent training program, teacher workshops, and teacher material, and she teaches both students and adults. Ms. Blume has served as advisor for and has lectured at other museum education programs, including the Cincinnati Museum of Art and the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco. She holds a B.A. from Smith College. Jean Henning has http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Aesthetic Education University of Illinois Press

Looking to Learn: Museum Educators and Aesthetic Education

The Journal of Aesthetic Education , Volume 42 (2) – May 25, 2008

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
ISSN
1543-7809
Publisher site
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Abstract

NANCY BLUME, JEAN HENNING, AMY HERMAN, AND NANCY RICHNER Introduction Museum education. Aesthetic education. How are they similar? How do they differ? How do they relate to each other? What are their goals? As museum educators working with classroom and art teachers, we are often asked these questions, and we ask them ourselves. "What do you DO?" is probably the most frequently asked question of all, and the answer is complex. Even more complex is how these questions relate to the Rembrandt Project. Given that looking at original works of art is such a priority for museums and museum educators, how do we address the project's reliance on technology? And how do these questions relate to the social studies and visual arts standards, Nancy Blume is head of arts education at Asia Society, where she has worked since 1989. She is responsible for the docent training program, teacher workshops, and teacher material, and she teaches both students and adults. Ms. Blume has served as advisor for and has lectured at other museum education programs, including the Cincinnati Museum of Art and the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco. She holds a B.A. from Smith College. Jean Henning has

Journal

The Journal of Aesthetic EducationUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: May 25, 2008

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