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Indigenizing Philosophy on Stolen Lands: A Worry about Settler Philosophical Guardianship

Indigenizing Philosophy on Stolen Lands: A Worry about Settler Philosophical Guardianship Indigenizing Philosophy on Stolen Lands: A Worry about Settler Philosophical Guardianship anna cook University of the Fraser Valley in canada, after the publication of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s final report on the Indian Residential Schools, universities and town halls have been flooded with questions about how they are going to implement its ninety-four calls to action and how they are going to pro- mote reconciliation on stolen lands. Many universities have taken heed of the call to “Indigenize” their curricula. The worry remains, however, that the language of reconciliation is empty rhetoric that “metaphorizes” decoloniza- tion, rather than responding to the demands of Indigenous communities for self-determination and land back (Tuck and Yang). For example, we might be wary of the Canadian government’s language of reconciliation when it is compatible with police raids against Wet’suwet’en land defenders opposed to the Coastal GasLink Pipeline Project (which prompted the creation of the hashtag #reconciliationisdead on Twitter). This paper considers what the activity of “Indigenizing” academic phi- losophy (and ethics, more specifically) might involve, and envisions philoso - phy education that is responsive and responsible to land and community. As 5 6 a settler to the Stó:lō territory, where I currently http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

Indigenizing Philosophy on Stolen Lands: A Worry about Settler Philosophical Guardianship

The Pluralist , Volume 17 – Feb 26, 2022

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
ISSN
1944-6489

Abstract

Indigenizing Philosophy on Stolen Lands: A Worry about Settler Philosophical Guardianship anna cook University of the Fraser Valley in canada, after the publication of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s final report on the Indian Residential Schools, universities and town halls have been flooded with questions about how they are going to implement its ninety-four calls to action and how they are going to pro- mote reconciliation on stolen lands. Many universities have taken heed of the call to “Indigenize” their curricula. The worry remains, however, that the language of reconciliation is empty rhetoric that “metaphorizes” decoloniza- tion, rather than responding to the demands of Indigenous communities for self-determination and land back (Tuck and Yang). For example, we might be wary of the Canadian government’s language of reconciliation when it is compatible with police raids against Wet’suwet’en land defenders opposed to the Coastal GasLink Pipeline Project (which prompted the creation of the hashtag #reconciliationisdead on Twitter). This paper considers what the activity of “Indigenizing” academic phi- losophy (and ethics, more specifically) might involve, and envisions philoso - phy education that is responsive and responsible to land and community. As 5 6 a settler to the Stó:lō territory, where I currently

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Feb 26, 2022

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