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God, Value, and Nature by Fiona Ellis (review)

God, Value, and Nature by Fiona Ellis (review) Volume 39, n o. 2, m ay 2018 71 God, Value, and Nature. f iona e llis. n ew y ork: o xford u niversity Press, 2014. x + 230 pp. $99 cloth. (r eviewed by r eese h aller, m ichigan s tate u niversity) i n God, Value, and Nature, f iona e llis dissects philosophical and theological positions on the metaphysics of our universe. d rawing on the works of John m cd owell and Peter r ailton, e llis examines the dominant dichotomy between naturalism and supernaturalism among the perspectives of scientists, philoso- phers, and theologians. s he challenges this metaphysical bifurcation, reframing the question of naturalism. r ather than asking what fits into the category of natural (real) and what fits into the category of supernatural (unreal or inac- cessible), the question should be, how should we understand this category of natural that we are talking about in the first place (11, 20)? e llis then seeks to expand the scope of what we can consider to be natural, arguing for what she calls “expansive naturalism,” which accounts for things like values and g od, and situates them in the natural world (203–4). e http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Theology & Philosophy University of Illinois Press

God, Value, and Nature by Fiona Ellis (review)

American Journal of Theology & Philosophy , Volume 39 (2) – Aug 24, 2018

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
2156-4795

Abstract

Volume 39, n o. 2, m ay 2018 71 God, Value, and Nature. f iona e llis. n ew y ork: o xford u niversity Press, 2014. x + 230 pp. $99 cloth. (r eviewed by r eese h aller, m ichigan s tate u niversity) i n God, Value, and Nature, f iona e llis dissects philosophical and theological positions on the metaphysics of our universe. d rawing on the works of John m cd owell and Peter r ailton, e llis examines the dominant dichotomy between naturalism and supernaturalism among the perspectives of scientists, philoso- phers, and theologians. s he challenges this metaphysical bifurcation, reframing the question of naturalism. r ather than asking what fits into the category of natural (real) and what fits into the category of supernatural (unreal or inac- cessible), the question should be, how should we understand this category of natural that we are talking about in the first place (11, 20)? e llis then seeks to expand the scope of what we can consider to be natural, arguing for what she calls “expansive naturalism,” which accounts for things like values and g od, and situates them in the natural world (203–4). e

Journal

American Journal of Theology & PhilosophyUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Aug 24, 2018

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