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“I Am Not Down with That”: King of the Hill and Sitcom Satire

“I Am Not Down with That”: King of the Hill and Sitcom Satire ethan thompson when fox sent out screening copies of and well-conceived shots at the world of King of the Hill prior to its debut in early 1997, pickups, trailers, dysfunctional families and included were a couple of curious freebies for supermarket busybodies”—as if pickup trucks critics: a bag of pork rinds and a Weber bar- and dysfunction naturally went hand-in-hand. beque grill. In retrospect, this gesture signaled Variety further suggested Hank Hill’s buddies an ambiguous relationship between viewers provided the “fundamental redneck humor,” and the program’s characters and community. not so much through what they said but who Clearly the pork rinds and barbeque grill were they were (Gallo). The program itself rose above considered to be emblematic of the world of such characterizations, though it was certainly the program’s characters and indicative of what willing to find humor within its population. might distinguish the show from other animated Though a few critics over the years have contin- sitcoms. Still, pork rinds are available at most ued to suggest the program is “laughing at” its any convenience store, even in Hollywood, and characters, others have recognized that Hank, barbeque grills populate backyards all across his family, and his friends http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Film and Video University of Illinois Press

“I Am Not Down with That”: King of the Hill and Sitcom Satire

Journal of Film and Video , Volume 61 (2) – May 16, 2009

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1934-6018

Abstract

ethan thompson when fox sent out screening copies of and well-conceived shots at the world of King of the Hill prior to its debut in early 1997, pickups, trailers, dysfunctional families and included were a couple of curious freebies for supermarket busybodies”—as if pickup trucks critics: a bag of pork rinds and a Weber bar- and dysfunction naturally went hand-in-hand. beque grill. In retrospect, this gesture signaled Variety further suggested Hank Hill’s buddies an ambiguous relationship between viewers provided the “fundamental redneck humor,” and the program’s characters and community. not so much through what they said but who Clearly the pork rinds and barbeque grill were they were (Gallo). The program itself rose above considered to be emblematic of the world of such characterizations, though it was certainly the program’s characters and indicative of what willing to find humor within its population. might distinguish the show from other animated Though a few critics over the years have contin- sitcoms. Still, pork rinds are available at most ued to suggest the program is “laughing at” its any convenience store, even in Hollywood, and characters, others have recognized that Hank, barbeque grills populate backyards all across his family, and his friends

Journal

Journal of Film and VideoUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: May 16, 2009

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