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Georgia

Georgia 246 jo ur n al o f ed ucatio n fin ance David G. Buckman and Tommy Jackson p r io r ities and p r ess ing s tate iss ues affecting p–12 and higher ed ucatio n As reported by the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute (GBPI), issues impact- ing the financial condition of Georgia’s K-12 and higher education systems were influenced by cost shifting, pre-kindergarten effectiveness, and tuition increases. Although Georgia’s funding has improved, the state’s funding is not sustaining Georgia’s student needs. Over the past year, Georgia’s student poverty levels (as defined by federal free and reduced-price lunch) have increased from 44% to 52%. Considering the state has shifted significant costs to the school districts in the areas of school bus driver and support staff health insurance, the effect of the increased funding is decreased. In addition to increases in student poverty levels, Georgia’s pre-kindergarten program has negatively ae ff cted Georgia budget priorities. In efforts to meet the quality standards recommended by the National Institute of Early Education Research, the governor’s education reform commission decreased class sizes as well as increased the pay of lead and assistant teachers to improve effectiveness. es Th e http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Education Finance University of Illinois Press

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1944-6470

Abstract

246 jo ur n al o f ed ucatio n fin ance David G. Buckman and Tommy Jackson p r io r ities and p r ess ing s tate iss ues affecting p–12 and higher ed ucatio n As reported by the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute (GBPI), issues impact- ing the financial condition of Georgia’s K-12 and higher education systems were influenced by cost shifting, pre-kindergarten effectiveness, and tuition increases. Although Georgia’s funding has improved, the state’s funding is not sustaining Georgia’s student needs. Over the past year, Georgia’s student poverty levels (as defined by federal free and reduced-price lunch) have increased from 44% to 52%. Considering the state has shifted significant costs to the school districts in the areas of school bus driver and support staff health insurance, the effect of the increased funding is decreased. In addition to increases in student poverty levels, Georgia’s pre-kindergarten program has negatively ae ff cted Georgia budget priorities. In efforts to meet the quality standards recommended by the National Institute of Early Education Research, the governor’s education reform commission decreased class sizes as well as increased the pay of lead and assistant teachers to improve effectiveness. es Th e

Journal

Journal of Education FinanceUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Apr 10, 2018

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