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Emergentism, Perspectivism, and Divine Pathos

Emergentism, Perspectivism, and Divine Pathos Donald A. Crosby / Colorado State University n his book Divine Beauty: The Aesthetics of Charles Hartshorne, Daniel A. Dombrowski performs a welcome service by bringing into clear focus a large number of the extensive writings of Hartshorne and relating them to the topic of aesthetics.1 In so doing, he shows how central Hartshorne's analysis of aesthetic experience is to various aspects of his thought, including but by no means restricted to his views on the nature of art and the place of the arts in human life. Dombrowski brings Hartshorne's ideas on aesthetic experience into the context of the writings of aestheticians and other thinkers, comparing and contrasting his views with theirs, and in that way elaborating and clarifying Hartshorne's views. He adds his own pertinent, provocative reflections to the mix and for the most part rises to Hartshorne's defense on disputed matters. The result is a carefully researched, imaginatively organized, and thoughtfully developed discussion of interrelated themes running throughout Hartshorne's thought. I am deeply appreciative of the formidable amount of work and analysis that has gone into Dombrowski's book and commend him for it. The critical comments to which I shall devote the rest of this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Theology & Philosophy University of Illinois Press

Emergentism, Perspectivism, and Divine Pathos

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
2156-4795
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Abstract

Donald A. Crosby / Colorado State University n his book Divine Beauty: The Aesthetics of Charles Hartshorne, Daniel A. Dombrowski performs a welcome service by bringing into clear focus a large number of the extensive writings of Hartshorne and relating them to the topic of aesthetics.1 In so doing, he shows how central Hartshorne's analysis of aesthetic experience is to various aspects of his thought, including but by no means restricted to his views on the nature of art and the place of the arts in human life. Dombrowski brings Hartshorne's ideas on aesthetic experience into the context of the writings of aestheticians and other thinkers, comparing and contrasting his views with theirs, and in that way elaborating and clarifying Hartshorne's views. He adds his own pertinent, provocative reflections to the mix and for the most part rises to Hartshorne's defense on disputed matters. The result is a carefully researched, imaginatively organized, and thoughtfully developed discussion of interrelated themes running throughout Hartshorne's thought. I am deeply appreciative of the formidable amount of work and analysis that has gone into Dombrowski's book and commend him for it. The critical comments to which I shall devote the rest of this

Journal

American Journal of Theology & PhilosophyUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Sep 26, 2010

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