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Ellen Gates Starr and Julia Lathrop: Hull House and Philosophy

Ellen Gates Starr and Julia Lathrop: Hull House and Philosophy jane duran University of California at Santa Barbara much work has recently been done on Jane Addams, her writings, and the general atmosphere and thought associated with Hull House and other settlement places in American cities.1 But although we might think of Addams and her work as the center of the Hull House effort, many other women (and a few men) were involved in the efforts, and the strengths that they brought to bear on the activities in Chicago in the early part of the twentieth century need to be delineated and, to some extent, given pride of place. Two women whose work was applauded by Addams at the time, but whose thought remains somewhat under investigated are Ellen Gates Starr and Julia Lathrop. Indeed, Addams wrote a book about her partnership with the latter, and that particular piece is often cited in general commentary about her writings.2 The women involved in the Hull House community often trod a dangerous and individualistic path, with few to note their achievements, and with a growing chorus of derogatory remarks. Living alone or sometimes with other women, they chose an adult role that was completely at variance with most of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

Ellen Gates Starr and Julia Lathrop: Hull House and Philosophy

The Pluralist , Volume 9 (1) – Mar 1, 2014

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1944-6489
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Abstract

jane duran University of California at Santa Barbara much work has recently been done on Jane Addams, her writings, and the general atmosphere and thought associated with Hull House and other settlement places in American cities.1 But although we might think of Addams and her work as the center of the Hull House effort, many other women (and a few men) were involved in the efforts, and the strengths that they brought to bear on the activities in Chicago in the early part of the twentieth century need to be delineated and, to some extent, given pride of place. Two women whose work was applauded by Addams at the time, but whose thought remains somewhat under investigated are Ellen Gates Starr and Julia Lathrop. Indeed, Addams wrote a book about her partnership with the latter, and that particular piece is often cited in general commentary about her writings.2 The women involved in the Hull House community often trod a dangerous and individualistic path, with few to note their achievements, and with a growing chorus of derogatory remarks. Living alone or sometimes with other women, they chose an adult role that was completely at variance with most of the

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Mar 1, 2014

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