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Editorial Statement

Editorial Statement As I write this note in the high summer of 2011, I am proofreading the second issue of SAAP proceedings to appear in this journal, edited by your Vice- President (and my colleague and friend) Ken Stikkers. The issue is thrilling. I do not exaggerate. By the time any of you reads this note, you’ll know what I mean. With the publication of the issue in your hands now, my service to our profession as a journal editor comes to a close. While The Pluralist has been the official journal of SAAP for only a short time, the journal itself has a much longer history. I will not trouble our present readers recounting that story, but I do think there are some lessons to be taken from it, which I will offer, for whatever they are worth. Academic publishing is changing very rapidly. Very soon the physical print journal, produced at great cost and sent around the world by surface mail, will all but cease to exist. The exchange of intellectual labor by this medium grew steadily for five hundred years, and the journal in your hands can fairly be said to have benefitted from the very height of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1944-6489

Abstract

As I write this note in the high summer of 2011, I am proofreading the second issue of SAAP proceedings to appear in this journal, edited by your Vice- President (and my colleague and friend) Ken Stikkers. The issue is thrilling. I do not exaggerate. By the time any of you reads this note, you’ll know what I mean. With the publication of the issue in your hands now, my service to our profession as a journal editor comes to a close. While The Pluralist has been the official journal of SAAP for only a short time, the journal itself has a much longer history. I will not trouble our present readers recounting that story, but I do think there are some lessons to be taken from it, which I will offer, for whatever they are worth. Academic publishing is changing very rapidly. Very soon the physical print journal, produced at great cost and sent around the world by surface mail, will all but cease to exist. The exchange of intellectual labor by this medium grew steadily for five hundred years, and the journal in your hands can fairly be said to have benefitted from the very height of

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Mar 2, 2012

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