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Eating Apes, Eating Cows

Eating Apes, Eating Cows erin mckenna Pacific Lutheran University this paper focuses on animal issues--specifically relating to the animal beings we eat--using the perspective of American pragmatism. This essay grows out of my earlier work that used American pragmatism, specifically the work of John Dewey, to argue that we can develop a productive process model of utopia. In this model, it becomes important for us to critically examine the goals we choose to pursue because what we choose to pursue in the present sets the limits and possibilities of what we will be able to pursue in the future. Utopian visions are future-focused. We need goals, or ends-in-view, to help direct our present actions. If we give up on the idea of perfection often connected with utopian visions, such thinking can be an important way to realistically examine present action in light of future hopes and desires. Rather than seek perfection, the process model of utopia seeks to create and sustain people willing to take on responsibility and participate in directing their present toward a better, more desirable future. This is an ongoing task.1 Intelligence allows us to address problems that arise and arrive at successful habits of action. It should also http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Pluralist University of Illinois Press

Eating Apes, Eating Cows

The Pluralist , Volume 10 (2) – Jun 19, 2015

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Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Illinois Press
ISSN
1944-6489
Publisher site
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Abstract

erin mckenna Pacific Lutheran University this paper focuses on animal issues--specifically relating to the animal beings we eat--using the perspective of American pragmatism. This essay grows out of my earlier work that used American pragmatism, specifically the work of John Dewey, to argue that we can develop a productive process model of utopia. In this model, it becomes important for us to critically examine the goals we choose to pursue because what we choose to pursue in the present sets the limits and possibilities of what we will be able to pursue in the future. Utopian visions are future-focused. We need goals, or ends-in-view, to help direct our present actions. If we give up on the idea of perfection often connected with utopian visions, such thinking can be an important way to realistically examine present action in light of future hopes and desires. Rather than seek perfection, the process model of utopia seeks to create and sustain people willing to take on responsibility and participate in directing their present toward a better, more desirable future. This is an ongoing task.1 Intelligence allows us to address problems that arise and arrive at successful habits of action. It should also

Journal

The PluralistUniversity of Illinois Press

Published: Jun 19, 2015

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